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Area Studies Microforms

Area Studies microforms collections are those collections which pertain to a specific region and/or country. Collections are grouped by region, and within region, alphabetically by country. Be sure to check listings for both the general resources and the

Brown, George Alexander, 1803-1870. Diaries and Memoirs of George Alexander Brown in the Liverpool Library.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform Limited, 1972 
1 reel(s)

George Alexander Brown, a Liverpool merchant and banker, spent his boyhood days in Baltimore. His uncle, a linen merchant, employed him in his firm, Alexander Brown & Sons of Baltimore. Brown regarded himself as an American, even though half his life was spent in England. His diaries date from his days in Baltimore. They include comments on the decline of the linen trade after 1817, his partnership in a merchant firm in Tampico, Mexico, in 1825, and his establishment in Liverpool in 1829. The diaries thereafter concern political, family, and business affairs, including notes on the arrival of American ships and reactions to events in America. Most of his knowledge of these events was drawn from the newspapers of the day.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is on the reel.

FILM 22:4

Great Britain. Foreign Office. Further Correspondence Respecting the Affairs of North America, 1912-1921. F.O. 414.

London: Public Record Office, 1967 
3 reel(s)

The official correspondence in this collection from 1913 through 1915 focuses primarily on the situation in revolutionary Mexico. Correspondents discuss the mounting tension between the United States and the Huerta regime and examine the security of British citizens and property in Mexico. They also communicate the current political situation in the United States, concerns about the Panama Canal, and demands for rights in the seal fisheries off the Pribiloff Islands. After 1916, the correspondence includes such topics as the Pan-American Conference, the debate over the League of Nations in the United States Congress, post-World War I territorial adjustments, and especially the Washington Conference of 1921.

A table of contents appears at the beginning of each group of letters. Ellis Library has numbers 235-248.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 10:13

Humboldt, Alexander von. Political Essays on the Kingdom of New Spain Containing Researches Relative to the Military Defense of New Spain: with Physical Sections and Maps.

London: Longman (and others), 1811 
2 reel(s)

These volumes contain research “relative to the geography of Mexico, the extent of its surface and its political division into intendancies, the physical aspect of the country, the population, the state of agriculture and manufacturing and commercial industry, the canals projected between the South Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, the Crown revenues, the quantity of the precious metals which have flowed from Mexico into Europe and Asia since the discovery of the new continent, and the military defense of New Spain.” Reel 1 contains volumes 1-2. Reel 2 contains volumes 3-4.

Note: Translation of "Essai politique sur le royaume de la Nouvelle Espagne" which forms pt. 3 of "Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland." Translated by John Black.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC

Schaeffer, Luther Melanchthon. Sketches of Travels in South America, Mexico and California.

New York: James Egbert, 1860 
1 reel(s)

Schaeffer was a miner who kept a record of his three-year journey to and from California by way of South America and Mexico. He sailed from New York in March 1849 on the ship Flavius and stopped in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Valparaiso, Chile, before reaching San Francisco in September. He worked a number of mines around middle and northern California and sailed for the tropics several more times before arriving back in New York in June of 1852.

FILM MISC

Smith, Isaac, of Indiana. Reminiscences of a Campaign In Mexico

Indianapolis: Chapmans & Spann, 1848 
1 reel(s)

Smith was in Company “D” of the 1st Regiment of the Indianapolis Volunteers in the Mexican War. He gives a history of the campaign in order to vindicate the conduct of all the volunteers “who have been assailed by officers in the regular army and newspaper writers.” It was written so after his return from Mexico, in the summer of 1847, and also contains resolutions of the Missouri Legislature, a letter of Lt. Kingsbury, and a brief sketch of the 4th and 5th infantries. He writes that the Indiana volunteers “were the victorious conquerors of Huamantla, Puebla, Atlixco, and Tlascala.”

Second edition. Title continues “an account of the operations of the Indiana brigade on the line of the Rio Grande and Sierra Madre, and a vindication of the volunteers against the aspersions of officials and unofficials.” Table of contents and appendix at end.

FILM MISC

United States. Department of State. Consular Despatches from the United States Consuls in Ciudad Juarez (Paso Del Norte), Mexico, 1850-1869.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1950 
File microcopies of records in the National Archives. Microcopy no. M 184; v. National Archives Record Group 59.
1 reel(s)

Ellis Library owns the first reel of the six-reel collection. The material dates from April 10, 1850, to December 23, 1869 (the full collection covers the years from 1830 to 1906). This period saw considerable upheaval in Mexico with the overthrow of Santa Anna, the promulgation of the Liberal Constitution of 1857, the resulting War of the Reform, the European intervention, the French occupation, and the war between the republicans under Benito Juarez and the French-conservative alliance under Maximilian. The consuls in Paso del Norte kept a close eye on American interests in that city and monitored activities along the border.

An uncataloged guide, Despatches from United States Consuls in Ciudad Juarez (Paso del Norte), Mexico, 1850-1906, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide contains a description of the entire six-reel collection, a table of contents for each reel, and a list of related microfilm collections produced by the National Archives. A register of all dispatches in the six-reel collection is located at the beginning of the first reel.

FILM 1:13

United States. Department of State. Consular Despatches from United States Consuls in Chihuahua, Mexico, 1864-1866.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1951 
1 reel(s)

This collection consists of the dispatches from Reuben Creel, United States consul at Chihuahua, Mexico, to the secretary of state, and related documents. Creel reports primarily about those events relating to the war between the Mexican republican forces under Benito Juarez and the French occupation forces under Maximilian. This collection is only a portion of the three reel collection originally published on microfilm by National Archives that covers the years 1830 to 1906.

The dispatches are arranged chronologically. Reels 1-3.

FILM BOOK 0332

United States. Department of State. Consular Despatches from United States Consuls in Veracruz, Mexico, 1857-1860.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1950 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 183; v. National Archives record group 59.
2 reel(s)

In 1857, Mexican Liberals promulgated the Constitution of 1857 igniting the War of the Reform. Conservatives sought foreign assistance against the Liberals and welcomed French intervention. In 1862, the French placed Maximilian on the throne of Mexico but later abandoned him to defeat and execution by forces under Benito Juarez. In these dispatches, the United States consul at Veracruz reports extensively on the war, the French occupation and the reception of Maximilian into Mexico. He also reports on the welfare of North American interests in Mexico during the disruption.

An uncataloged guide, Despatches from United States Consuls in Veracruz, 1822-1906, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide contains a description of the material in the entire eighteen reel series (1822-1906), a complete list of related documents in the National Archives on microfilm and a list of reel contents. Only reels 7 and 8 are available in Ellis Library. Each reel contains introductory material similar to that provided in the guide.

FILM 1:13

United States. Department of State. Consular Despatches from United States Ministries in Mexico, 1823-1829; 1860-1872.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 
National Archives Microfilm Publications Microcopy no. M97; v. National Archives record group 59.
23 reel(s)

The reels owned by Ellis Library is part of a much larger collection which ranges from 1823 to 1906. The topics covered in the Ellis collection include claims of citizens of one country for damages on the other, boundary disputes along the common border, Mexican attitudes toward the Civil War in the United States, the French occupation and the reign of Maximilian, and raids across the border by Apaches, Comanches, and Kickapoos. Ellis' collection currently contains reels 2-4 and 28-47 of the set.

An uncataloged guide, Despatches from United States Ministers in Mexico, 1823-1906, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide contains a table of contents for all of Microcopy 97 from 1823 to 1906 including this collection, an introduction with a list of topics covered by the collection, a list of related materials in National Archives microfilm publications, and an index of authors.

FILM 1:10

United States. Department of State. Notes from the Mexican Legations in the United States to the Department of State, 1815-1831.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1943 
File microcopies of records in the National Archives. Microcopy no. M 54; v. National Archives record group 59.
1 reel(s)

The material in this collection covers relations between the United States and Mexico from 1816 to 1831. During this period, Mexicans achieved independence from Spain and Iturbide became the short-lived Emperor of Mexico as Augustin I. Vicente Guerrero became the first President of the new Mexican Republic. Conflict over the United States-Mexico boundary, especially concerning Texas, was a constant theme for diplomatic discussions between the two countries. Mexicans were also concerned about the increasing volume of immigration from the United States into eastern Texas. Many of the documents are in Spanish, but usually are accompanied by English translations.

An uncataloged guide, Notes from the Mexican Legation in the United States to the Department of State, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide contains a description of the material, a list of Mexican representatives to the United States, the dates of their correspondence, and a list of related works. Ellis Library only has reel one of this 39 reel collection which covers the period 1815-1906.

FILM 1:7

United States. Department of State. Records of the Department of State Relating to Internal Affairs of Mexico, 1910-29.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1959 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 274; v. National Archives record group 59
243 reel(s)

The Mexican Revolution, a war that began in 1910 and continued sporadically until the new constitution was adopted in 1917, is the chief subject of this Department of State decimal file. There are accounts of President Porfirio Diaz's forced resignation, the election and assassination of President Francisco I. Madero, the military dictatorship of Victoriano Huerta, the unsuccessful attempt by revolutionary leaders Venustiano Carranza, Francisco "Pancho" Villa, and Emiliano Zapata to settle their differences, the defeat of Villa in 1915 by Carranza forces, and the de facto recognition by the United States of the Mexican government under Carranza and Villa. Many documents relate to military activities and movements of government and rebel forces. During the 1920s correspondence concerns problems resulting from the Mexican government's attempt to introduce various reforms provided for in the constitution of 1917. Other documents are concerned with the expropriation of foreign owned property, labor disputes, and land reforms.

An uncataloged guide, Records of the Department of State Relating to Internal Affairs of Mexico, 1910-29, is available in the Special Collections Office and is also filmed preceding the complete list of documents that comprise reels 1-9. The documents are arranged by subject according to the Department of State's decimal classification system.

FILM 3:2-3:5

United States. Department of State. Records of the Department of State Relating to Political Relations Between the United States and Mexico, 1910-1929.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1960 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 314; v. National Archives record group 59.
29 reel(s)

The records in this decimal file relate to the adjustment of boundaries, the maintenance of friendly relations, and treaty negotiations. Subjects discussed include the "forged correspondence" of 1926 allegedly giving information on State Department policy to President Callas of Mexico, Mexican reaction to the American punitive expedition against Pancho Villa, President Carranza's opposition to the Monroe Doctrine, and the recognition of the Obregon government. Approximately half of the collection deals with boundary questions: channel shifts on the Rio Grande, construction of international bridges, diversion of waters, fishing, and navigation

An uncataloged guide, Records of the Department of State Relating to Political Relations Between the United States and Mexico, 1910-1929, is available in the Special Collections Office and is also reproduced on the first reel. A list with brief abstracts, also on the first reel, serves as a finding aid. The documents are arranged by subject according to the decimal classification system of the Department of State.

FILM 3:5-6

United States. Department of State. State Department Territorial Papers: New Mexico, 1851-1872.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1954 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 17; v. National Archives record group 59.
4 reel(s)

Territorial papers of New Mexico date from its formation in 1851 until supervision of all territories was transferred from the Department of State to the Department of the Interior in 1873. A large portion of the papers relate to personnel disputes in the territorial government, including charges of malfeasance and requests for removal from office. Indian depredations (livestock and other property stolen and persons killed) are enumerated. The availability of rich mineral deposits, especially silver and gold, is discussed in the governor's annual reports as are grape culture and the use of mesquite for consumption and for firewood. Many of the earlier documents are in English and Spanish. The collection is arranged chronologically.

Catalog of National Archive Microfilm Publications lists the inclusive dates on each reel. Also useful is REF CD3030 .P3 Parker, David W. Calendar of the Papers in Washington Archives Relating to the Territories of the U.S. (to 1873), pp. 264-301.

FILM 8:11

Guides:

Parker, David W. Calendar of papers in Washington archives relating to the territories of the United States (to 1873) by David W. Parker.

United States. National Archives and Records Service. Catalog of national archives microfilm publications.

United States. Department of the Interior. Interior Department Appointment Papers: Territory of New Mexico, 1850-1907

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1969 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 750; v. National Archives record group 48.
18 reel(s)

New Mexico was established as a territory in 1850. Originally the territory included parts of Arizona, Nevada, and Colorado. The records pertain to positions in New Mexico Territory normally filled by presidential appointment: the territorial governor and secretary, the surveyor general, registers and receivers in the public land offices, the superintendent of Indian affairs, and Indian agents. Letters of application and recommendation, petitions, oaths of office, removals, and resignations are included in the collection. Land office records from Clayton, Folsom, Roswell, Las Cruces, and Santa Fe are included. Abiquiu, Cimarron, Mescalero, Navajo, Pueblo, and Southern Apache Indian agency appointment records are filmed.

An uncataloged guide titled Interior Department Appointment Papers: Territory of New Mexico, 1850-1907 is available in the Special Collections Office and is also filmed on the first reel. It includes an alphabetical listing of applicants and office-holders.

FILM 8:10

United States. Department of the Interior. Interior Department Territorial Papers: New Mexico, 1851-1914.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1962 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 364; v. National Archives record group 48.
15 reel(s)

The proceedings of the governors of the territory from 1874 until statehood in 1912, include official acts, proclamations, letters of appointment, oaths of office, pardon letters, and extradition orders. There are no transcripts for portions of 1876, 1885, 1889, and 1903. Letters dated from 1858 to 1907 relate to public buildings and grounds, the Adobe Palace (Palace of the Governors) in Santa Fe, and the inspection of coal mines. The last three reels are subject-classified files of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior. They include correspondence, memoranda, reports, legal papers, and other records about territorial schools, statehood, extradition negotiations with Mexico, and land transactions, especially with the American Lumber Company, the Pennsylvania Development Company, and the New Mexico Fuel and Iron Company.

An uncataloged guide, Interior Department Territorial Papers: New Mexico, 1851-1941, is available in the Special Collections Office and is also filmed on reel one.

FILM 5:5

United States. Department of the Interior. Interior Department Territorial Papers: New Mexico, 1851-1914.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1962 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 364; v. National Archives record group 48
15 reel(s)

The proceedings of the governors of the territory from 1874 until statehood in 1912, include official acts, proclamations, letters of appointment, oaths of office, pardon letters, and extradition orders. There are no transcripts for portions of 1876, 1885, 1889, and 1903. Letters dated from 1858 to 1907 relate to public buildings and grounds, the Adobe Palace (Palace of the Governors) in Santa Fe, and the inspection of coal mines. The last three reels are subject-classified files of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior. They include correspondence, memoranda, reports, legal papers, and other records about territorial schools, statehood, extradition negotiations with Mexico, and land transactions, especially with the American Lumber Company, the Pennsylvania Development Company, and the New Mexico Fuel and Iron Company.

An uncataloged guide, Interior Department Territorial Papers: New Mexico, 1851-1941, is available in the Special Collections Office and is also filmed on reel one.

FILM 5:5