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Area Studies Microforms

Area Studies microforms collections are those collections which pertain to a specific region and/or country. Collections are grouped by region, and within region, alphabetically by country. Be sure to check listings for both the general resources and the

Britain and Europe Since 1945.

Brighton, Eng.: Harvester, 1973 
Harvester / Primary social sources

The basic collection brings together source material from sixty-seven pressure groups involved in Britain's campaign to join the European Economic Community. The thirty-one single-interest pressure groups and the thirty-six multi-interest groups represent virtually the full range of postwar pressure groups in this field. Annual updates carry the file on established groups forward and add material from new participants in the continuing debate.

MICF 382.9142

Guides:

Britain and Europe since 1945: a bibliographical guide.

The guide provides chronological, author, and title access. Supplements arrive with each annual update.

Britain’s Literary Heritage: Nineteenth Century Theatre Periodicals Parts One and Two from the British Library.

Brighton: Harvester Microform Publications, 1986
41 items

19 titles.

Each title fully cataloged in MERLIN and shelved with the microfilmed periodical collection, FILM PER. Consult MERLIN for call number for each title. A list of the titles in the collection is available in the Special Collections office or search the series title in MERLIN.

British Records Relating to America in Microform.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Microform Limited (Formerly EP Microform),

This series of microfilm collections, published in conjunction with the British Association for American Studies, ranges in time from the colonial period to the twentieth century, and in place from Quebec to the West Indies. The collections relate to trade, industry, plantations, agriculture, immigration, the anti-slavery movement, politics, and military affairs. Located in various British archival collections, the papers selected contribute to the understanding of American history usually through the business and personal affairs of British subjects. Introductions at the beginning of each filmed collection explain the provenance and the historical background for each collection. Collections in Ellis Library are further described under their individual authors or titles in this guide.

FILM 22:2-13 - Request access

Guides:

A Guide to manuscripts relating to America in Great Britain and Ireland : a revision of the guide edited in 1961 by B. R. Crick and Miriam Alman. Available under call number Z1236 .C74 1979.

The guide briefly describes various collections in this series. Each collection in Ellis Library is listed in this database and/or MERLIN, the online catalog.

Great Britain. Colonial Office. America and West Indies; Original Correspondence (Various): C.O. 5.

London: Public Record Office,
56 reel(s)

This collection is the largest and most important Colonial Office group on American colonial history. It consists of the original correspondence and entry books of the old Board of Trade and Plantations and the secretary of state. The Board of Trade and Plantations managed the early economic development of the American colonies until its abolition in 1782. The military and political government was under the control of the secretary of state. The papers include miscellaneous letters from authorities in England to military personnel and secretaries of state in the colonies, letters exchanged between governors, and petitions from colonists. Topics covered in Ellis' holdings include a narrative of the Boston Tea Party, peace negotiations, Indian affairs, the Canadian, Carthagena, and Louisburg expeditions, expenses of colonial establishments, correspondence of Lieutenant General John Burgoyne and Major General William Heath concerning American troops captured at Saratoga, patents and grants of land in North Carolina (1707-1775), and letters of governors, the Board of Trade, and the secretary of state, Lord Shelburne, relating to West Florida.

Ellis Library has vol. 7-9, 41, 42 (incomplete), 43-45. Vol. 36 of List and Indexes provides a general index to the collection.

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Guides:

Andrews, Charles McLean, 1863-1943. Guide to the materials for American history, to 1783, in the Public record office of Great Britain

The guide provides the historical background of the collection and a partial (but useful) list of contents.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Lists and indexes.

Great Britain. Colonial Office. Barbadoes. Original Correspondence. 1689/1752: (C.O. 28; C.O. 537).

London: Public Record Office, 1969
30 reel(s)

Barbados (formerly known as Barbadoes) was first settled in 1627 by the British. As a British colony, Barbados traded (not always legitimately) with New England, New York, and Virginia throughout the colonial period, exchanging sugar, cotton, molasses, and ginger for foodstuffs. Many settlers migrated from Barbados to the Carolinas. This collection contains original correspondence with the Board of Trade and the secretary of state. Letters from the governors, including James Kendall, James Cunninghame, Edwin Stede, and Henry Grenville, relate to petitions, memorials, and proceedings in chancery and admiralty courts. Topics include the security of Barbados and regulation of goods (mainly sugar) exported to Europe.

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Cameroons Under United Kingdom Administration 1920/21-1938.

New York: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1972
2 reel(s)

In 1922 the League of Nations awarded mandates to the French and British over the German protectorate of Cameroon. The British were given jurisdiction over the western section of the territory. Beginning in 1922 the lieutenant-governors of Nigeria, as administrators of the areas within the British sphere, prepared reports for submission to Parliament, and, in later years, for submission to the League of Nations. Reports discuss the status of the territory, international relations, administration, public finance, taxation, trade statistics, legal questions, police, prisons, defense, arms, education, slavery, labor, religion, public health, land tenure, forestry, agriculture, mines, population statistics, public works, and marine affairs.

The title varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. Paper copies for 1922 to 1923 and 1925 to 1938 are in Annex I (J805.N15).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Report of His Britannic Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Council of the League of Nations on the Administration of Iraq.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1973
1 reel(s)

In 1920 the League of Nations granted Great Britain a mandate over Iraq. The mandate ended in 1932. During this period, the Colonial Office issued reports on its administrative actions. Subjects include political developments within the country, foreign relations, jails, health services, agriculture, foreign trade, budgets, civil and criminal courts, legislation, military training, public works, and education. Appendices include the texts of specific legislation.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each report. The microfilm covers reports from 1920 to 1932. Paper copies for the same time period are available (956.7 G79).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Report of His Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the General Assembly of the United Nations on the Administration of Togoland Under United Kingdom Trusteeship. 1920/21-.

London: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1972
2 reel(s)

The early reports on the British trusteeship of Togoland were issued by the governor of the Gold Coast. In 1919 Great Britain gained control of the eastern section of the former German protectorate of Togo (now part of Ghana and the Republic of Togo). In 1922 the League of Nations confirmed a mandate for Great Britain over British Togoland. British Togoland eventually joined with the Gold Coast to form the independent nation of Ghana. The British Colonial Office reports cover administrative concerns, such as international relations, finance, taxation, trade statistics, the court system, police, prisons, defense, arms, social conditions, labor, religion, education, public health, land tenure, forestry, agriculture, and mines.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. The microfilm collection covers reports for 1920 to 1938. Paper editions for 1920 to 1936 are available in Annex I (J809.N15).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Tanganyika Under United Kingdom Administration: Report by Her Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the General Assembly of the United Nations. 1920-.

Washington, D.C.: he Library of Congress for Adronicus, 1970
2 reel(s)

After defeating the German Army in 1916 at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro, the British Army occupied German East Africa. In 1919, Britain obtained a protectorate over the conquered territory, renamed Tanganyika (Tanzania), from the League of Nations. Beginning in 1921, colonial administrators began sending annual reports to the British Colonial Office concerning conditions in the territory. The initial report contains extensive background information, including geography, local history of the period to 1921, the ethnography of local tribes, current information on administration, population, finance, trade, agriculture, industries, land tenure, police, prisons, health, and government services. Subsequent reports update this information annually through 1938. In 1946 the reports resumed and continued until 1963. Of these later reports, Ellis has the paper copy only for 1959.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. The film covers the period from 1920 to 1938. Paper copies for dates 1920 to 1938 and 1959 are available in Annex I (J801.N15).

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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Correspondence Respecting China, 1848-1922. F.O. 405, 1-239.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
33 reel(s)

By 1848, when this collection of official correspondence begins, Britain had established a sphere of influence in China at Canton. She continued to extend that sphere in the face of competition from other European nations and Japan. Britain also faced considerable hostility from Chinese nationalists. This hostility resulted in the "Arrow" War, the Taiping Rebellion, and the Boxer Rebellion. By 1922, the nationalist Kuomintang party under Sun Yat-sen had overthrown the Manchu dynasty, established the Republic of China, and faced rebellions from local warlords and the Chinese Communists under Mao Tse-tung. The correspondence differs in focus, from specific incidents, such as an attack on British subjects, or specific subjects, such as railways in China, to general correspondence for a stated period.

The correspondence is grouped by subject. A list of correspondence appears at the beginning of each group.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Correspondence Respecting Japan 1859-1922. F.O. 410, 1-73.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
9 reel(s)

Correspondence to and from British ministers to Japan dates from the relaxation of Japan's isolation policy through World War I. As the Japanese expanded their territorial influence, Great Britain and Japan forged a strong Anglo-Japanese alliance. England supported Japan in its bid against Russia for Korea and Manchuria. As an ally, Japan declared war on Germany in 1914, seizing German islands in the Pacific region. The relationship cooled after World War I as Great Britain and the United States formed a new coalition and Japan was not allowed to annex the seized German colonies. The correspondence deals with the establishment of a British consulate in Japan, the progress of trade agreements, commercial treaties, tariffs, the protection of British subjects, the relationship of Japan with other nations, and other diplomatic concerns.

The letters are arranged in chronological order. A list of correspondence at the beginning of each volume indicates the subject content.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Further Correspondence Respecting Southeast Asia, 1883-1922. F.O. 422.

London: Public Record Office, 
7 reel(s)

Letters of the Foreign, Colonial, and India Offices and their ministers relate to British interests in Southeast Asia. Correspondence, beginning in 1883, documents the establishment of a French protectorate over Annam and Tonquin, later known as Indochina and as Vietnam. Other correspondence reports on the affairs of Burma and Siam (Thailand). In 1893, France took over Laos east of the Mekong, leading to fears of a French attack on Bangkok. The British favored the maintenance of a buffer state between French holdings and British possessions such as Burma and others. In final negotiations, both Great Britain and France guaranteed the independence of Siam. The letters discuss various treaty negotiations, the protection of British-registered companies and British subjects, trade, the construction of railways, and conferences concerning the demarcation of the frontiers of Burma and Siam.

A list of correspondence with subject notes precedes each volume. The general arrangement is chronological with some subject grouping by region.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Further Correspondence Respecting the Affairs of North America, 1912-1921. F.O. 414.

London: Public Record Office, 1967 
3 reel(s)

The official correspondence in this collection from 1913 through 1915 focuses primarily on the situation in revolutionary Mexico. Correspondents discuss the mounting tension between the United States and the Huerta regime and examine the security of British citizens and property in Mexico. They also communicate the current political situation in the United States, concerns about the Panama Canal, and demands for rights in the seal fisheries off the Pribiloff Islands. After 1916, the correspondence includes such topics as the Pan-American Conference, the debate over the League of Nations in the United States Congress, post-World War I territorial adjustments, and especially the Washington Conference of 1921.

A table of contents appears at the beginning of each group of letters. Ellis Library has numbers 235-248.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. India Office. Library. Miscellaneous Publications from the India Office Library and the India Office Records, 1897-1919.

London: Kodak, Limited, 1968 
2 reel(s)

The period of 1897 to 1919 saw an increasing nationalist agitation in British India. The Indian National Congress pressured Lord Curzon's colonial administration to grant Indians greater participation in the government. With their large contribution of men to the British army in World War I, Indian leaders expected additional reforms but were sorely disappointed. This disappointment made them receptive to Gandhi's non-cooperative movement. India's internal problems were compounded by conflict among Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs. The titles of the materials in this collection are: Report of the 10th National Social Conference (1897), Report of the 13th National Social Conference (1899), Lahore Guide and Directory (1917), Islam and Ahmadism and Notes on Hindus and Sikhs (1895), Politico-Criminal Who's Who (1914), Political Trouble in India (1907-1917), and An Account of the Ghadi Conspiracy (1919).

NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. India Office Record Selections.

London: Kodak, Ltd, 1964 
5 reel(s)

These records contain letters, charts, bills, proceedings, and reports regarding India in the early 1900s. Reel 1 contains proceedings of the Home Department, January 1902-December 1907. Reel 2 contains proceedings of the Home Department, January 1908-October 1909, and proceedings of the Department of Revenue and Agriculture, January 1907, and July-September 1909. Reel 3 contains Home Department reports regarding the plague from 1904-1907, proceedings from the Department of Revenue and Agriculture from 1902 and 1904, agriculture bills, and 1903 maps showing positions of the Chenab Nahri Circle in different areas of India. Reel 4 contains proceedings from the Department of Revenue and Agriculture from 1905-1908 and 1910, and confidential letters to the Governor General of India in Council. Reel 5 contains confidential letters, newspapers articles, and criminal reports regarding East Indians in British Columbia, a paper on the Hindu-Muhammadan riots from 1889-1893, and Home Department letters.

Note: Selected by N.G. Barrier in the summer of 1964.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Inquiry into the Characters of Parties in the British Government.

London: Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, 1782 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet discusses the Monarchical and Republican parties and events which have influenced them: “the Roman and Saxon establishments in Britain;” “the Norman establishment of the events which gradually formed the English Government;” “the reigns of the Stuarts;” and “the reigns since the Revolution to the present period.” It also discusses Tories and Whigs and their various characteristics.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Inquiry into the Origin and Consequences of the Influence of the Crown Over Parliament.

London: 1780 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet was written to call attention to the topics of: “shortening the duration of parliaments,” “increasing the number of representatives,” and “altering the nature of representation in order to destroy the influence of the crown over parliament.” It also discusses Britain’s failure in the American Revolution and states that “the influence of the crown [upon members of parliament] is too great for the safety of the constitution, and ought to be diminished.”

Title continues “Submitted to the Consideration of the Electors of Great Britain.” Dedicated to the “Right and Honourable The Earl Temple, A Young Nobleman.”
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Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. British Sessional Papers, 1731-1900 {London, H.M.S.O.}.

New York: Readex Microprint, 1964

The House of Commons bills, the House of Commons papers, and the Command papers (1731-1900) are sorted into four classes: 1) public bills, 2) reports from committees of the House of Commons, 3) reports from commissioners, inspectors and others (reports of Royal Commissioners, standing and ad hoc advisory committees, and various annual reports), and 4) accounts and papers (financial and statistical returns and treaty papers). Within each class the documents are arranged under alphabetical subject headings. Subjects reflect the variety of concerns of the British government, such as taxes, the relief of debtors, elections, government reform, the slave trade and the abolition of slavery, military affairs, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, improvements in transportation and communication, and the opening of Africa and the Far East. The collection consists of 80,000 documents totaling nearly 5,000,000 pages. It was originally published during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in more than 6,000 volumes. The last volume of each session contains a subject index and a numerical listing of bills, reports, accounts and papers, and command papers. The library has paper copies of sessional papers for the years between microform holdings.

MICPT 328.42

Guides:

British Sessional Papers: Collection of Indexes

The guide is shelved after the British Sessional Papers collection. It contains assorted indexes covering the period 1696 to 1900.

Irish University Press. Checklist of British parliamentary papers in the Irish University Press 1000-volume series, 1801-1899. –

This guide lists papers in chronological order for the stated period and also provides access by broad or specific subjects.

Lees-Smith, Hastings Bertrand, 1878-1941. A guide to parliamentary and official papers, by H. B. Lees-Smith.

This guide gives background information about the organization of the papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. List of House of Commons sessional papers, 1701-1750; edited by Sheila Lambert.

The guide is arranged chronologically with the papers for each session divided into the following categories: bills, reports of commissioners, reports of committees, accounts and papers, and command papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons Official Report.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1987

The Parliamentary Debates are the official records of things said in Parliament. Since 1909, they are mostly verbatim, and written in the first person style. The Debates are published daily and weekly. Debates on a Bill are issued together and are subsequently published in bound volumes. There is an index for each volume and a general index for the whole year. A government minister in the department responsible for the measure normally proposes a Bill. Main principles are outlined and important clauses summarized. The official Opposition spokesman responds and the views of other Opposition parties and backbenchers are heard. The debate normally concludes with a response from another government minister who deals with major points raised during the debates.

MICF 4826

Guides:

Ford, P. (Percy), 1894- A guide to parliamentary papers; what they are, how to find them, how to use them

The guide traces the development and organization of the parliamentary papers. It explains how standards were set for the compilation, scope, grammatical style, and cost of production of the debates.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Parliamentary Papers. Bills {London: H.M.S.O.}.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1980

The House of Commons bills, the House of Commons papers, and the Command papers cover the period from 1979 to 1980 to date for each session of Parliament. They contain reports, correspondence, bills, accounts, statistics, and other materials Parliament ordered to be printed. Header strips on each microfiche identify the collection as a bill, a House of Commons paper, or a Command paper and give the collection title, the session date, and the pagination if an item extends beyond one fiche. The library has paper copies of sessional papers for years between microform holdings

Guide: [microfiche] House of Commons. Sessional Papers. Monthly Index. 1985-. This index is located in the Special Collections Office.

MICF 328.42

Guides:

Great Britain. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. Government publications issued during …

Lees-Smith, Hastings Bertrand, 1878-1941. A guide to parliamentary and official papers, by H. B. Lees-Smith.

This guide gives background information about the organization of the papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Lords Official Report.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES (HANSARD). HOUSE OF LORDS OFFICIAL REPORT.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1987

The Parliamentary Debates are the official records of things said in Parliament. Since 1909, they are mostly verbatim, and written in the first person style. The Debates are published daily and weekly. Debates on a Bill are issued together and are subsequently published in bound volumes. There is an index for each volume and a general index for the whole year. The House of Lords papers take the same form as those of the Commons. The content is different in that the House of Lords do not represent constituencies nor are they involved in matters of taxation and finance. But they do debate other major issues of current interest. A government minister in the department responsible for the measure normally proposes a Bill. Main principles are outlined and important clauses summarized. The official Opposition spokesman responds and the views of other Opposition parties and backbenchers are heard. The debate normally concludes with a response from another government minister who deals with major points raised during the debates. The House of Lords rarely debates in smaller committees as does the House of Commons. Their debates normally take place in the "committee as a whole".

MICF 4827

Guides:

Ford, P. (Percy), 1894- A guide to parliamentary papers; what they are, how to find them, how to use them

The guide traces the development and organization of the parliamentary papers. It explains how standards were set for the compilation, scope, grammatical style, and cost of production of the debates.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet Letters in the Royal Archives, 1868-1916. Cab. 41.

London: Public Record Office, 1966
12 reel(s)

Until the formation of the Cabinet Secretariat in December 1916, no minutes were kept of the proceedings of British cabinet meetings. The only record of cabinet decisions was contained in the letters written by prime ministers to the sovereign after each meeting. These letters, which vary from brief statements of subjects discussed to more detailed accounts of arguments made and decisions reached, are preserved in the Royal Archive at Windsor Castle. This microfilm collection contains copies of almost 1,700 of these letters written between 1868 and 1916. Disraeli, Gladstone, Salisbury, Campbell-Bannerman and Asquith were the Prime Ministers.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet letters at Windsor, 1868-1916.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet Papers, 1880-1916, 1918-1923. Cab. 37, 26, 27.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
54 reel(s)

Cabinet ministers arranged for a printed memorandum to be circulated to their colleagues when they wanted to provide them with information or to secure their approval for a proposal. After the formation of the Cabinet Secretariat in December 1916, complete sets of papers were filmed and preserved. Before 1916 the papers that survived were scattered in a number of official and private collections; these papers have also been filmed and included in this collection. Topics covered include foreign relations, colonial affairs, taxation, and internal affairs.

FILM 11:1-2; 16:1 - Request access

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of Cabinet papers, 1880-1914.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Memoranda: 1915 to 1922. Cab. 24.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
31 reel(s)

Papers prepared by ministers and officials that were printed and circulated to the British Cabinet from 1915 to 1922 are included. Their purpose was to initiate discussion of new policies, to state arguments for and against proposals made by ministers or departments, or simply to provide background information on topics to be discussed by the Cabinet. Although matters discussed at Cabinet meetings were frequently raised verbally by a minister, the most common method of bringing any subject to the attention of the Cabinet was by circulation of printed or typewritten memoranda in advance of a meeting. Among matters discussed were expenditures, activities of the League of Nations, foreign relations, postwar planning, and colonial matters. Included are memoranda circulated to the War Cabinet (December 1916 – October 1919).

(List and index society series. V. 29, 41, 52, 156). These indexes provide subject access to the collection.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 10:13-14 - Request access

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List & Index Society Series

Great Britain. Public Record Office. The records of the Cabinet Office to 1922.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Minutes and Conclusions of the War Cabinet and Cabinet. Cab. 23/1-47, 61-67, 81-88.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
16 reel(s)

Minutes and conclusions of the War Cabinet, formed on December 9, 1916, span the period from 1916 to 1937. Subjects discussed are naval, military, domestic, and diplomatic matters such as news from the battle fronts, troop movements, disposition of guns and munitions, man-power planning, agreements with other countries, and peace proposals. Later meetings discuss reparations, treaties, shipping, continuing problems in Ireland, and foreign relations. The papers provide an unambiguous statement of each decision reached, a general synopsis of the expert evidence upon which conclusions were based, and a general summary of the arguments for and against the decisions made.

(List and index society series. V. 40, 51, 61, 62, 92, 100). These guides provide subject access. An index on reels 14-16 also provides subject access.

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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List & Index Society Series

Great Britain. Public Record Office. The records of the Cabinet Office to 1922

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Papers of the Committee of Imperial Defense, 1888-1914: Cab 38, 1-28.

London: Public Record Office, 1967 
9 reel(s)

In 1902 the Defense Committee of the Cabinet, formed in 1895, reorganized to include not only Cabinet ministers, but also heads of the Army and Navy. In 1904, the Prime Minister took the responsibility of the chairmanship, with absolute discretion in the selection of other members. The committee considered questions of defense against invasion both at home, and in particular, overseas territories. Memoranda concern subjects such as the Russian threat to India in Afghanistan and Persia (Iran), Egyptian defense, the Suez Canal, the Far East, national insurance of war risks, mine defenses, censorship, Russian navy movements, possible military action against Germany, and use of wireless telegraphy.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of papers of the Committee of Imperial Defence to 1914 [by A. W. Mabbs]

The guide provides a chronological list of documents as they appear on the film. Subject content notes are provided.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Papers of the War Council, Dardanelles Committee and War Committee, 1914-1916: Cab 42, 1-26.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
8 reel(s)

In November 1914, the Cabinet of Great Britain appointed a War Council to consider general matters of war policy. The War Council existed only six months. In May 1915, the Coalition government created the Dardanelles Committee to review operations in the Dardanelles and Gallipoli. Replacing the War Council, it extended its deliberations to more general strategic and operational problems. On November 3, 1915, the War Committee superseded the Dardanelles Committee. For the thirteen months of its existence, committee's agenda covered the whole range of naval and military operations and the more general aspects of war policy. By the later part of 1916, it had assumed a considerable measure of executive authority in the day-to-day conduct of the war. It dealt with complicated problems of production, manpower, food supply, shipping, and other matters affecting the war effort, as well as diplomatic relations with allies and neutral countries.

FILM

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of Cabinet papers, 1880-1914.

Imperial War Museum (Great Britain). Women at Work Collection from the Imperial War Museum.

Brighton, Sussex: Harvester Microforms, 1984 
91 reel(s)

This extensive documentary record including diaries, correspondence, reports, press clippings, leaflets, pamphlets, and photographs depicts the role of women primarily in Britain during the first World War (1914-1918). Topics include women's employment, women's involvement in benevolent organizations and overseas service, and women's education. Also included are local records from English cities, towns, and counties.

FILM BOOK 0318 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

The Women at work collection from the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth, London

Social and Political Status of Women in Britain. Radical and Reforming Periodicals for and by Women, 1870-1928.

Brighton, Sussex, England: Harvester Press Microform Publications, 1983 
17 reel(s)

Eighteen journals chronicling the women's emancipation movement in England represent the period of greatest feminist activity, 1870 to 1928. Topics covered include the suffrage question, the position of women at work and in the home, education, temperance, social reform, birth control, and the role played by the churches as organizing bases for women's activities. A number of titles are devoted largely to single issues such as suffrage. Others provide an overall picture of women's issues.

A listing of contents for the entire series appears at the beginning of each reel.

FILM BOOK 0106 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

United States. Department of State. Despatches from United States Ministers to Great Britain, 1791-1906.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1943 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 30; v. National Archives record group 59.
200 reel(s)

These dispatches, addressed to the Department of State by United States diplomatic representatives to Great Britain between November 19, 1791, and August 10, 1906, are for the most part the original dispatches, often accompanied by enclosures. The dispatches relate to such subjects as the negotiation of Jay's Treaty, restrictions on American shipping during the Napoleonic wars, suppression of the African slave trade, boundary disputes, a proposed ship canal in Central America, and fishing rights. Also included are unnumbered, informal communications reporting secret matters or personal news, occasional telegrams, and memoranda prepared by State Department officials.

An uncataloged guide, Despatches From United States Ministers to Great Britain, 1791-1906, available in the Special Collections Office, provides access by author and indicates the time period for each reel. Also, reel one includes a description of the collection and a chronological index through 1870 indicating subject content.

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United States. Department of State. Foreign Letters of the Continental Congress and the Department of State, 1785-1790.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1943 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 61; v. National Archives record group 59.
1 reel(s)

The microfilm contains instructions to American ministers and consuls abroad. The instructions were dispatched by John Jay, Secretary for Foreign Affairs, later acting head of the Department of State (January 14, 1785 – March 3, 1790), and by Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State (March 30 – December 23, 1790). The letters deal with a wide variety of subjects: diplomatic relations with foreign governments (Holland, Great Britain, France, Spain, Portugal, and Morocco), American loans abroad, commerce, shipping, slavery, and relations between the Congress and individual states of the Union.

A short introductory note and an index-register of the letters precedes the letters.

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United States. Department of State. Records of the Department of State Relating to Internal Affairs of Great Britain, 1910-1929.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1965 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 580; v. National Archives record group 59.
249 reel(s)

Records from the central files of the Department of State contain instructions to and dispatches from diplomatic and consular officials. The dispatches are often accompanied by diplomatic notes exchanged, pamphlets, pictures, and newspaper clippings. The largest group of records relates to Great Britain's military affairs. Other groups of records cover political affairs, economic matters, financial conditions, communication, and transportation. Records relating to British merchant vessels include accounts of the sinkings of the S.S. Lusitania and the S.S. Titanic. The collection also covers social, agricultural, industrial, and religious concerns. Other documents cover the internal affairs of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. The collection constitutes one of the Department of State's decimal files.

An uncataloged guide, Records of the Department of State Relating to Internal Affairs of Great Britain, 1910-1929, is located in the Special Collections Office. The lists of documents on reels 1 through 5 give brief abstracts of documents reproduced and serve as a finding aid for the documents. The documents are arranged by subject according to the Department of States decimal classification system.

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United States. Department of State. Records of the Department of State Relating to Political Relations Between Great Britain and Other States, 1910-29.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1965 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 582.; v. National Archives record group 59.
13 reel(s)

Great Britain's relations with countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa are documented in this Department of State decimal file. The largest group of records reproduced concern relations between Great Britain and the Soviet Union. The file is concerned with subjects such as war, peace, friendship, alliance and non-aggression pacts, questions of neutrality, contraband, enemy property, limitation of armaments, boundary settlements, cession of territory, commerce and navigation, extraterritoriality, naturalization and immigration, fur seals and fisheries. The Index to Treaty Series 1923-1928 is also reproduced.

An uncataloged guide, Records of the Department of State Relating to Political Relations Between Great Britain and Other States, 1910-29, is available in the Special Collections Office. A complete list of the contents of the collection precedes the documents. They are arranged by subject according to the Department of State's decimal classification system.

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