Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Journalism - Information Gathering Resources

Use Information From the "Backgrounding News Sources" Tab to Answer the Following Questions:

  • Explain the step-by-step process that you used to find the information.
  • Indicate what you found.
  • Determine whether the information that you found is trustworthy.

Backgrounding with News Sources

1. Using the Columbia Missourian digital archives of the print paper (login & password are on the "Backgrounding..." page) and searching the Columbia Missourian digital story archives look for articles that include "University of Missouri."

  • How many "hits" did you receive in each archive?
  • When was the newest article in the digital archive (using both terms) published?
  • When was the oldest article published?

2.  Using Factiva

  • What is an IPO?
    • Find 3 IPOs that are planning to go public soon.  (limit to last year; use terms planned, IPOs ,2016; use Boolean operator w/(#of words) for more precise search)
  • Search international news sources for information about the effect low oil prices have on the Russian economy.

Suggested Activity:

Write a story around public opinion about security, versus privacy before and since September 11, 2001.  Include information about events that have occurred since 9/11 that seem to restart conversations, such as Edward Snowden's release of classified documents and his recent interview.  Create an infographic timeline showing changes in attitudes over the last 15 years.  Mine global, national, regional and local news databases for combinations of words appearing in news stories written about these topics.  Whenever possible, use reader comments from online news sites to help enhance your story.  Search public opinion polls and social media for trending topics relating to your subject. 

  • Look for differences in point of view or tone
  • Search U. S. and European publications for the same information, during the same time frame.  How does all coverage compare?