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Revolutionary War Microforms

Adams Family. Microfilms of the Adams Papers Owned by the Adams Manuscript Trust and Deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society

Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1954
608 reel(s)

This family archive, estimated at more than 300,000 pages, covers the lives and contributions of President John Adams (1735-1826), Abigail Adams (1744-1818), President John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), Charles Francis Adams (1807-1866), and their wives and children. Included are diaries, letter books, autobiographical writings, legal papers, political essays and speeches, legislative papers, family letters, and other items. The set is a rich vein of source material for early American history from the time of the Revolution until after the Civil War. The earliest paper is dated 1639, the latest 1889.

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Guides:

Microfilms of the Adams papers

The guide contains a table of contents for the collection.

American Manuscript Maps in British Repositories, Phase I, 1763-1783, the Peace of Paris to the American Revolution.

East Ardsley, England: E. P. Microform, 1978
British Records Relating to America in Microform
4 reel(s)

This collection consists of maps used by British officials on both sides of the Atlantic to conduct colonial affairs. The material includes general maps of North America as well as regional maps of areas such as British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and the St. Lawrence River, Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Vermont. It also includes maps of West Indian islands including Bermuda, Antigua, the Bahamas, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Martenique, Puerto Rico, St. Vincent, and Tobago.

MU Ellis Special Collections Microfilm

Guides:

Manuscript Maps Relating to North America and the West Indies Part 1: The Revolutionary Era PDF

American Material from the Holt-Gregson Papers in the Liverpool Central Library.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform, 1972
British records relating to America in microfilm
1 reel(s)

Printed and manuscript materials collected by John Holt (1743-1801) and Mathew Gregson (1749-1824) cover the history of Liverpool and the English slave trade. By 1790 Liverpool had become the major English slave-trade port, exporting slaves from Africa to the West Indies. It also quickly became the leading port in the rapidly expanding trade with America. In 1788 a local branch of the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was formed by Quakers and Unitarians. Arguments from both sides of the issue are included. Also included are materials relating to privateering during the American Revolutionary War (1776-83).

A description is on reel one.

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American Material from the Tarleton Papers in the Liverpool Record Office.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform, 1974
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

These papers cover several generations of the Tarleton family and deal with the history of Liverpool in the eighteenth century, particularly the history of trade. A prominent Liverpool family, the Tarletons were involved in the African and West Indian slave trade. The Tarletons’ business records during the eighteenth century are included. In the second half of that century, John Tarleton IV owned several slaving ships and traded with Jamaica, the Leeward Islands (Antigua), and Grenada in the West Indies. His son Banastre made a reputation as a British cavalry officer during the Revolutionary War.

A description of the collection is on the first reel.

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American Papers in the House of Lords Record Office.

Wakefield, Yorkshire, Eng.: Microforms Limited, 1984
British records relating to America in microform
39 reel(s)

This collection covers the period of British-American relations from 1621 to 1917. The material from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries reflects Parliament’s commercial and strategic interest in the colonies, the controversy over Parliament’s right to tax the colonies, the American War for Independence, and various questions on slavery and the slave trade. This latter topic tends to dominate the papers after 1800.

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Guides:

Minchinton, Walter E. American papers in the House of Lords Record Office : a guide PDF

The guide contains an introduction describing the background of the collection, the subjects covered in the American papers and the editorial method used to select those papers. There is also an appendix with a list of contents on each reel. Finally, there is a calendar of each item and an index of the material. The guide is also available under call number Z1236 .A53 1983.

American Periodicals, 18th Century.

Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms International, 1946
American periodical series I
33 reel(s)

The eighty-eight titles in this collection trace the early evolution of the American periodical. It begins with two short-lived periodicals published in 1741 by Andrew Bradford and Benjamin Franklin, and extends through the increasing magazine activity after the Revolution. Four of the era's most important and longest-lived periodicals are included: the Columbian Magazine and the American Museum, both of Philadelphia, the Massachusetts Magazine of Boston, and the New-York Magazine. Subjects covered include politics and government, slavery, religion, books, and European news. Sentimental fiction, much of which was serialized, and Revolutionary pamphlets are also included. Titles are arranged alphabetically on the film.

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Guides:

Hoornstra, Jean. American periodicals, 1741-1900 : an index to the microfilm collections–American periodicals 18th century, American periodicals, 1800-1850, American periodicals, 1850-1900, Civil War and Reconstruction

This guide contains a title, general subject, editor, and reel index. The title index provides full bibliographic information and notes on character and content. Titles with holdings information are entered in the online catalog, MERLIN. Many of the titles are indexed in Poole’s Index to Periodical Literature. Also, additional author, title, and subject access is provided by the Early American Periodicals Index to 1850 (MICPT 016.05).

Chielens, Edward E. American literary magazines : the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

 

Index to Early American Periodicals to 1850

 

Nineteenth century readers’ guide to periodical literature, 1890-1899

An author, subject and illustrator index to the material in fifty-one periodicals (1003 volumes), and index to the book reviews and a title index to the short stories, novels, plays and poems

Poole’s index to periodical literature

Blaine, Ephraim, 1741-1804. Papers of Ephraim Blaine.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1968 
5 reel(s)

Ephraim Blaine, a merchant of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, became deputy commissary general and later commissary general of purchases for the Continental Army from 1777 to 1783. His papers cover the years 1763 to 1805 and number approximately 3,500 items. The papers include correspondence, memoranda of accounts, cash books, and abstracts of accounts. Blaine corresponded with the president of Congress, the superintendent of finance, various military officers, members of the Board of War, and men serving in the supply departments.

A description of the contents and arrangement is on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Bragg, John. Diary of John Bragg, in the Whitehaven Public Library and Museum, Cumberland.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng: Micro Methods, 1968
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

John Bragg was the proprietor of a successful shoe-making business in Whitehaven (Cumbria, N.W. England) during the second half of the eighteenth century. He was a deeply religious member of the Quaker faith. He married Margaret Hadwen in 1749, and it was through his wife’s brother, John Hadwen, a resident of Rhode Island, that he had an interest in America and the War of Independence. The diary, which begins in 1771, contains medical recipes, references to historical dates, selected newspaper articles, family notations, and a number of letters from Bragg’s relatives in America. It lists significant events in Whitehaven and in the Bragg family, and contains a number of references to the War of Independence. For example, it records news of events leading up to the war, battles during the war, and the arrival of Henry Fleming from Virginia.

A description of the contents is at the beginning of the reel.
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British Army Lists, 1740-1784.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England: Microform Academic Publications, 1984
British Records Relating to America in Microform
81 fiche

The Lists specifically cover the years 1740, 1743-44, 1747, 1753, 1757-58, 1762, and 1764-84. The Army Lists are concerned with listing all officers holding regimental appointments. At most times, the regimental establishment consisted of a commanding colonel, a lieutenant-colonel, a major, several captains and lieutenants, either ensigns or cornets, and a few other miscellaneous officers. This collection serves an invaluable function in tracing specific biographical information about individuals listed

MICF 1334

Guides:

The annual British Army lists, 1740-1784 PDF

The guide contains background information on the origins of the Army Lists, the regiment of establishment, the contents of the Army Lists, the uses of the Lists, a table of contents of the fiches, and a bibliographical note on related works. The Lists are indexed by name in each volume. Also available in Special Collections: UB415.G7 A5 1984.

British Pamphlets Relating to the American Revolution, 1763-1783.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Microform Limited, 1982
British records relating to America in microform
49 reel(s)

This collection reproduces every available British and Irish pamphlet relating to the American Revolution published between January 1, 1764, and December 31, 1783, over 1100 pamphlets in all. As a counterpart to the Early American Imprints series, it provides a British view of the collapse of the first British Empire and the birth of the United States. The pamphlets were selected from Thomas R. Adams’ The American Controversy. Topics addressed include political analysis, imperial organization, grand strategy, civil and political liberty, morality, ecclesiastical organization, economics, diplomacy, and the defense of personal reputations.

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NOT IN MERLIN

Guides:

Bonwick, Colin. British pamphlets relating to the American Revolution, 1764-1783 PDF

The guide provides an index by title and author and a list of contents for each reel. Available under call number Z1238 .B45.

Burke, Thomas ca 1747-1783. Thomas Burke Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library.

Burke, Thomas ca 1747-1783. THOMAS BURKE PAPERS IN THE SOUTHERN HISTORICAL COLLECTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY.

Chapel Hill, N.C: University of North Carolina Library, 1967 
5 reel(s)

Thomas Burke emigrated to America from Ireland, settling in Accomac County, Virginia. By 1769 he was a practicing attorney in Williamsburg. In 1772, he moved to Hillsborough, North Carolina. Active in politics, he was governor of North Carolina during one of the most critical periods in the state's history, 1781-1782. He actively resisted the British and Tory domination of the state. A raid by the Tory forces under David Fanning led to his capture and parole to James Island. He later escaped to North Carolina and resumed his duties as governor of the state. The papers are primarily concerned with business and personal matters until the mid-1770s. Increasing concern with political affairs from 1776 to 1781 stem from Burke's position as a member of the North Carolina General Assembly and as a delegate to the Continental Congress. Later papers discuss military affairs, his violation of parole, and the settlement of his estate.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Candid Thoughts; Or, an Enquiry into the Causes of National Discontents and Misfortunes Since the Commencement of the Present Reign.

1781
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet is critical of the reigning monarch at the time, King George III.

Note: Located on the reel labeled “Ramsay, Allan.”

Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL.

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AVAILABLE ONLINE

Caner, Henry, 1700-1792. Letterbook of the Reverend Henry Caner, 1728-1778.

East Ardsley, UK: Microform Academic Publishers, 2000
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

Henry Caner (c.1700-1792), born near Bristol, soon emigrated with his family to the New England colonies. After graduating from Yale University, Caner was ordained in 1727 in the Church of Engand and appointed as a missionary for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG). He returned to the colonies as a missionary to Connecticut and Massachusetts, becoming a leading Church of England clergyman. In 1747 he was named rector of King’s Chapel in Boston, the most important Anglican Church in New England. A staunch Tory Loyalist, Caner criticized the British government for its handling of the colonies. As many Loyalists did, Caner left for London in 1776 during the early part of the War for Independence and remained in England, living in Cardiff, South Wales and Bristol until he died in 1792. Although he enjoyed financial success in America, much of his assets were lost when he returned to England.

This microfilm reproduces the letterbook of Caner, one of the very few surviving letterbooks of an American Anglican clergy. Included are both official correspondence and personal letters from Caner dating from 1728 to 1778. Topics include family relations and kinship, personal reaction to events leading to the American Revolution, and life as a refugee Loyalist American in England after 1776. These topics reflect the social, economic, political, and religious life of the period. Also included are Caner’s view of George Whitefield, the Great Awakening, the Sons of Liberty, and Governor Thomas Hutchinson.

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Guides:

Simmons, R. C. The letterbook of the Rev. Henry Caner, 1728-1778 : from the Special Collections Department, Bristol University Library : a brief introduction to the microfilm edition. PDF  Guide also available under call number BX5885 .S56 2000.

Carr, Ralph 1711 -1807. American Papers of Ralph Carr.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, Yorkshire, Eng: EP Microform Limited, 1978
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

Ralph Carr was a merchant in Newcastle-on-Tyne who conducted an extensive trade with the American colonies during the middle of the eighteenth century. This collection contains correspondence and papers relating to that trade from 1741 to 1778. Most of the correspondence is to merchants in Boston and New York, with additional items to merchants in North Carolina, Philadelphia, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Virginia, and the West Indies.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

Minchinton, Walter E. The American papers of Ralph Carr : merchant of Newcastle-upon-Tyne 1741-1778 : in the Northumberland Record Office, Newcastle-upon-Tyne PDF

The guide contains the provenance of the collection, biographical information on Ralph Carr, a description of Carr’s American trade, a list of contents of the film, an index of American correspondents, and a bibliography of related works. The guide is filmed at the beginning of the reel and is also available under call number HF3505.4 .M5 1977.

Carroll, Charles 1737 -1832. Charles Carroll Papers

Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 1971
3 reel(s)

The microfilm includes a list of Carroll's correspondence in chronological order.
Charles Carroll's grandfather, Daniel Carroll, came to America from Ireland around 1670 and became the owner of large estates in Maryland. Charles took over the development of the 10,000-acre tract, known as Carrollton Manor, in Carroll County, Maryland. He was legally barred from political life because of his Catholicism. However, he was active in a series of debates about the Maryland government in 1770. He participated in the abortive attempt to form a union between Canada and the colonies. In 1776 he was elected a delegate to the Continental Congress and signed the Declaration of Independence. He represented Maryland as a senator in the first Federal Congress. As a Federalist, he was opposed to the War of 1812. These papers are based largely on the collection of the Maryland Historical Society. Material from thirteen other repositories was incorporated into the collection.

An uncataloged guide, Hanley, Thomas O'Brien (ed.). The Charles Carroll Papers, is available in the Special Collections Office and is also filmed on reel one.
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Currie, James. Journal of James Currie, 1776. Journal of a Voyage from Nixonton, North Carolina to the Island of St. Martin’s 19 September to 29 October 1776.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1964
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

James Currie of Scotland came to America in 1771 to work in the tobacco trade. When the War for Independence began, the actions of the Continental Convention and privateers continually disrupted Currie’s business and personal affairs. In September 1776, he left for the West Indies, keeping a journal of his voyage. During the voyage, he almost drowned, the vessel was fired upon and chased by an unknown vessel, and they heard of the defeat of the American troops on Long Island. Included with this journal is the autographed draft of a letter he sent to Pinckney’s Gazette of Philadelphia, in 1775. The letter defends the actions of Scottish tobacco merchants who refused to advance credit to planters following the failure of the Ayr Bank in 1772.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Danford, J. Diary of the Siege of Quebec, 1775.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1971
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

Although little is known of J. Danford, his diary is a useful account of the siege of Quebec. Possibly compiled from a mixture of personal information and official bulletins, it provides a Canadian perspective on the American War for Independence. It is probably a fair copy rather than the original draft.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Dartmouth, William Legge. American Papers of the Second Earl of Dartmouth in the Staffordshire Record Office.

Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England: Microform Academic Publishers, 1993
British Records Relating to America in Microfilm
16 reel(s)

The papers of the Earl of Dartmouth are an important private source for the American Revolution from a man at the center of the British government who helped in the developing of British policy before and during the Revolutionary War. William Legge, the second Earl of Dartmouth (1731-1801), served in the House of Lords from 1765, was the Secretary of State for the American Colonies from 1772-1775, and Lord Privy Seal from 1775 to 1782. The papers, dated 1765 to 1782, focus on Dartmouth’s term as American Secretary. Correspondents include Lord North (the Earl’s step-brother), King George III, the Duke of Newcastle, William Knox, Generals Howe and Gage, Thomas Hutchinson, and Benjamin Franklin, among others. In addition to correspondence the papers include colonial reports, Cabinet Minutes, and protest addresses from merchants.

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Guides:

The American papers of the Second Earl of Dartmouth in the Staffordshire Record Office PDF

The guide contains an introduction to the collection, a brief biography of the Earl of Dartmouth, a description of the manuscripts, and a bibliography. Available under call number DA506.D3 A4 1993.

Davis, John fl 1755-1783. John Davis Papers in the Library of Congress, Correspondence.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1966 
5 reel(s)

John Davis was an officer in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. The correspondence from May 28, 1755, through July 14, 1783, concern his efforts to gather and provide transportation and provisions for the Continental Army. Principal correspondents include Major General Nathanael Greene, the quartermaster general, as well as James Abeel, Clement Biddle, Mark Bird, John Cox, David Grier, Isaac Melcher, Charles Pettit, William Rippey, and Thomas Smith. Several letters dealing with personal business matters are from James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The fifth reel includes financial accounts from 1777 to 1780.

The correspondence is arranged chronologically.
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Documents Relating to the American Revolution, 1775-1783, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform Limited, 1977
British records relating to America in microform
4 reel(s)

Personal logs, journals, and letters of naval and merchant officers often differed considerably from the official reports sent to the Admiralty. John Starke, Benjamin Caldwell, George Collier, William Cornwallis, Thomas Lewis, Thomas Graves, William Henry, George Elphinstone, John Houlton, Sir Samuel Hood, Peter Rainier, William Spry, and Charles Saxton served as British officers operating in North American and West Indian waters from 1775 through 1783. Their logs and journals describe the siege of Quebec, the Battle of Chesapeake Bay, convoy escorts, and the Battle of the Saints. They provide details of naval operations in Canada, off New England and Nova Scotia, and from New York to Florida and the West Indies.

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Guide:

Documents Relating to the American Revolution, 1775-1783, in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich PDF

Early American Imprints, 1639-1800.

New York: Readex Microprint, 1955
31000 card(s)

This collection is a reproduction of the complete texts of approximately 42,000 books, pamphlets, and broadsides listed in Charles Evans' American Bibliography. Evans attempted to locate and describe everything printed in America up to 1800. Readex researchers added 12,000 works overlooked by Evans, as well as correcting his faulty entries. This series reflects, through the printed page, events through the American Revolutionary period. Titles are arranged chronologically in the order of entry in Evans' bibliography. They use the numbers assigned to each item by Evans. Although Evans listed magazines and newspapers, these are not included in the microprint edition but are filmed separately and described in this guide under American Periodicals and under Early American Newspapers.

MICPT 810.8

Guides:

Evans, Charles American bibliography; a chronological dictionary of all books, pamphlets, and periodical publications printed in the United States of America from the genesis of printing in 1639 down to and including the year 1820. With bibliographical and biographical notes.

Bristol, Roger P. Supplement to Charles Evans’ American bibliography.

Shipton, Clifford Kenyon National index of American imprints through 1800; the short-title Evans

Bristol, Roger P. Index of printers, publishers, and booksellers indicated by Charles Evans in his American bibliography.

Early American Newspapers.

New York: Readex Microprint, 1962

This collection of more than 2,000 American newspapers published before 1821 includes newspapers listed in Brigham's History and Bibliography of American Newspapers, 1690-1820. These newspapers contain a wide range of opinions and facts, foreign as well as domestic news, and items of interest to social, religious, political, and educational historians. Editorials, sermons, advertisements, obituaries, essays, poetry, fiction, political satire, ship arrivals, storms, accidents, medical controversies, war news, political campaigns, and immigration news should all prove useful to the researcher. Ellis Library currently has only selected titles, with an emphasis on newspapers from Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

An uncataloged guide, Cohen, Nathan (ed.). Early American Newspapers, available in the Special Collections Office, provides an annotated list of Ellis Library holdings.

MICPT 071

Ettwein, John Bp 1721-1802. Papers of John Ettwein from the Archives of the Moravian Church, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

New Haven, Conn.: Research Publications, 1969 
8 reel(s)

John Ettwein was born in 1721 in Wurttemberg (now incorporated into Baden – Wurttemberg, Germany). He joined the Moravian Church in 1740 and in 1754 he and his family embarked for America. They settled in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. The Moravians were isolated from Anglo-Saxon America. Their position in American life was complicated by their conscientious objection to bearing arms and their refusal to join in the American Revolution. It was largely through the efforts of John Ettwein that the Moravians were able to maintain a rapport with the American authorities and not suffer the same fate as many Loyalists after the Revolution. His papers consist of some 1,800 items and reflect a practical man, both literate and fluent in English who handled a great deal of the daily business for his religious community.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

Hamilton, Kenneth G. (Kenneth Gardiner), 1893- John Ettwein and the Moravian church during the Revolutionary period.

Appendix B in the guide provides a catalog of the Ettwein papers preserved in the Moravian Archives in Bethlehem.

Fawcett and Lister Papers from the Shibden Hall Folk Museum, Halifax.

Wakefield, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1967 
British records relating to America in microfilm
2 reel(s)

Letters and papers accumulated by the Lister family, who occupied Shibden Hall from 1614 to 1923, record the business and personal activities of the family. James Lister (1673?-1729) was an apothecary of Halifax and the owner of Shibden Hall. The papers include references to his wife, Mary, and their children and grandchildren. Their eldest child, Martha, married William, the son of Robert Fawcett (or Faucitt), a merchant and minor landowner of Bull Close, Halifax. The papers of their son William, later General Sir William Fawcett, cover various military matters, with references to the War for Independence including an account of the Battle of Lexington. Also included are manuscripts that relate to the trading careers in Virginia in the 1730s of several Lister brothers.

A description of the collection and its arrangement, including a list of correspondents, appears on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Fleming, Henry. Papers of Henry Fleming, 1772-1795: in the Cumbria Record Office.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: EP Microform Limited;, 1978
British Records Relating to America
1 reel(s)

This collection consists of a letterbook of Fleming’s outgoing letters from Norfolk, Virginia, April 1772 to October 1775, and from Whitehaven, Cumberland, April 1783 to October 1788; and an account book from 1776 to 1795 of debts owed to Fleming in America. In Virginia, Fleming traded tobacco, tar, and other colonial commodities for European goods. The letterbook discusses the impending revolution, and touches on indentured servitude and slavery.

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Guides:

The papers of Henry Fleming, 1772-1795 : in the Cumbria Record Office, Carlisle PDF

The guide includes a description and bibliography of the collection. The guide is also reproduced at the beginning of the reel. Also available under call number DA690.W58 F53.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Letters of Marque for the American War of Independence from the Public Record Office, London.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform Limited, 1980
British records relating to America
4 reel(s)

As in previous wars, the British Crown issued letters of marque allowing private individuals to seize American shipping during the War for Independence. The letters provide details about the vessel, its place of ownership, tonnage, type and armament, master, owner and crew, and the period for which it was under the letter of marque. At the beginning of the first reel, the legislation creating letters of marque is reprinted which contains all of the regulations and restrictions that accompanied their use.

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Guides:

Minchinton, Walter E. Letters of marque, declarations against America 1777-1783 : in the Public Record Office, LondonPDF

The guide contains the provenance of the letters, background information on letters of marque, the use of letters of marque during the American War for Independence, a list of reel contents, and a bibliography of related works.

Also available under call number  HF3505.4 .M483 1980.

Hamilton, Alexander 1757-1804. Papers

Washington, D.C.: 1955
46 reel(s)

Alexander Hamilton, first secretary of the treasury, placed the new nation on a firm financial footing. His advocacy of a strong national government brought him into bitter conflict with Thomas Jefferson. However his political philosophy was ultimately adopted in the development of the governmental structures. He was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. The papers are arranged in two series in chronological order (1760-1830 and 1749-1804) and also include reports to Congress (1790-1792), papers of the New York Artillery Company, and cash books.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

The works of Alexander Hamilton; containing his correspondence, and his political and official writings, exclusive of the Federalist, civil and military

Hamilton, Alexander. Farmer Refuted: Or, a More Impartial and Comprehensive View of the Dispute Between Great-Britain and the Colonies, Intended as a Further Vindication of the Congress.

New York: James Rivington, 1774
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet is Hamilton’s defense of the Continental Congress against Samuel Seabury’s Loyalist attacks in A View of the Controversy Between Great-Britain and her Colonies. Available on the web at http://opac.newsbank.com/select/evans/14096.

At the end of microfilm reel of Seabury, Samuel. (Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC.)
Note: Title continues “In answer to a letter from A.W. Farmer, intitled [sic] A View of the Controversy Between Great-Britain and her Colonies: Iincluding, a Mode of Determining the Present Disputes Finally and Effectually, etc.” Signed “A sincere friend to America.”

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Hamilton, Alexander. Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress, from the Calumnies of Their Enemies.

New York: James Rivington, 1774
1 reel(s)

Hamilton (1757-1804) was a lawyer, a captain in the Revolutionary War, George Washington’s personal secretary and confidential aide, a member of the first Continental Congress, a delegate to the Continental Convention, and the first Secretary of the Treasury. He was one of the authors of The Federalist, a commentary on the principles of government and American constitutional law, and was a leader in the Federalist Party after the death of Washington. He wrote this pamphlet at age 17 to defend the members of the Continental Congress against the attacks in Samuel Seabury’s Loyalist work Free Thoughts . . . Available on the web at http://opac.newsbank.com/select/evans/13313.

At end of Seabury, Samuel reel.

(Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC.)
Note: Title continues “In answer to a letter, under the signature of A.W. Farmer. Whereby his sophistry is exposed, his cavils confuted, his artifices detected, and his wit ridiculed; in a general address to the inhabitants of America, and a particular address to the farmers of the province of New-York.”

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Hartley, David, 1732-1813. Papers of American Interest Among the Hartley Russell Archives in the Berkshire Record Office, Shire Hall, Reading.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1966 
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

David Hartley entered Parliament in 1774. His career in the House of Commons lasted until 1784. Hartley advocated conciliation with the American colonists before and during the Revolution. He accepted American independence and believed the political separation need not involve complete commercial and spiritual separation. The papers contain much material on Hartley's activities before and during the war and at the peace conferences. Topics include notes on the conflict between Britain and France in North America (1749-1756) and subsequent peace negotiations. The papers also focus on American prisoners-of-war since Hartley acted as Great Britain's agent in negotiations with Benjamin Franklin for the exchange of prisoners.

A description of the collection is at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826. Thomas Jefferson Papers

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1974 
Presidential papers microfilm
65 reel(s)

These papers relate primarily to Jefferson's political and legal concerns. They include general correspondence, including drafts of state papers, copies of letters made by Jefferson from General Horatio Gates' Revolutionary-War letter book, and correspondence with officials. Also included are account books, court cases and readings on law, Randolph family manuscripts, Virginia law and historical records, collected letters, and miscellaneous bound volumes and clippings. Principal correspondents include John Adams, William Claiborne, Henry Dearborn, Albert Gallatin, Horatio Gates, Marquis de Lafayette, Benjamin Latrobe, James Madison, James Monroe, Thomas Randolph, William Short, Robert Smith, and George Washington. Ellis Library also has the earlier filming of the Jefferson papers. While not as comprehensive as the 1974 edition, the earlier filming has useful internal finding aids that do not appear in the later edition.

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Guides:

Index to the Thomas Jefferson papers

The guide provides an index by writer or recipient.

Knox, Henry 1750-1806. Microfilms of the Henry Knox Papers Owned by the New England Historic Genealogical Society and Deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1950 
55 reel(s)

When trouble erupted with the British in Boston in 1774, Henry Knox (1750-1806) left his occupation as bookseller and became a colonel of artillery in the newly-formed Continental Army. He played an instrumental role in forcing the British out of Boston when he and his men brought artillery pieces from the captured British post at Ticonderoga over the mountains to Boston in the winter of 1775-76. Later, Washington promoted him to brigadier general and Knox fought at Trenton, Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and Yorktown. He became secretary of war in 1785 under the Articles of Confederation. Washington reappointed him secretary of war in 1789 under the new Constitution. This collection of papers extends from 1719 to 1794. The materials include correspondence, legal documents and a variety of other materials accumulated by Knox.

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Guides:

Index to the Henry Knox papers owned by the New England Historic Genealogical Society and deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society.

The index is arranged alphabetically by the name of the individual in communication with Knox. Also included is a brief description of the contents of each document.

Lee Family Papers, 1742-1795.

Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Library, 1966 
8 reel(s)

In 1640, Richard Lee came to Virginia from England and became the progenitor of one of this nation's most distinguished families. Many of the papers in this collection relate to his descendants, Arthur and Richard Henry Lee, both sons of Thomas Lee. Arthur was a delegate to the Continental Congress and diplomatic agent with Benjamin Franklin in England and France. With Franklin and Silas Deane, he negotiated the treaty with France in 1776. Richard was a delegate to the Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He served as senator from Virginia from 1789 to 1792. This collection is an excellent source for the study of the American Revolution, particularly the climate of opinion which preceded it. The papers also shed light on the history of Great Britain and other European countries, for the Lees were truly cosmopolitan, well-connected abroad, and perceptive in their observations. Within this collection, major correspondents include John Adams, Silas Deane, Ralph Izard, Thomas Jefferson, Henry Laurens, Robert Morris, Edmund Pendleton, John Ross, and George Washington.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

Guide to the microfilm edition of The Lee family papers, 1742-1795.

The guide provides background, reel notes, and a list of major correspondents.

Letter to the Rev. Dr. Cooper, on the Origin of Civil Government.

London: 1777 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet is critical of a sermon given by Cooper at Oxford University.

Note: Located on the reel labeled “Ramsay, Allan.”

Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL.

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Lincoln, Benjamin, 1733-1810. Benjamin Lincoln Papers

Boston, MA: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1967 
Massachusetts Historical Society. Microfilm publication no. 3
13 reel(s)

Benjamin Lincoln was appointed major general in the Continental Army in 1776. He, in conjunction with Artemas Ward, commander of the forces in Massachusetts, provided the leadership that broke the blockade of Boston. He also won distinction in operations in New York and during the Saratoga campaign of 1777. Lincoln was later given command of the American army in the South, and was forced to surrender to the British in 1780. Following a prisoner exchange, he became Secretary of War. In 1787 he commanded the Massachusetts forces that suppressed Shay's rebellion. Washington described him as "having prov'd himself on all occasions an active, spirited, sensible Man." Lincoln began saving his papers systematically early in his life, particularly after his appointment as major general in the spring of 1776. His papers provide insight into the military history of the Revolution and the problems encountered in the establishment of the government during the 1780s and 1790s, like delineating the border between Maine and Canada, settling relations with Indians, getting the Constitution ratified in individual states, and dealing with Shay's rebellion.

"Massachusetts Historical Society. Microfilm publication no. 3
An uncataloged guide, Allis, Frederick S. Jr. (ed.). Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Benjamin Lincoln Papers, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide provides background, a description of the contents of each reel, and a list of correspondents."
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Lind, John. Three Letters to Dr. Price Containing Remarks on His Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty, the Principles of Government, and the Justice and Policy of the War with America.

London: 1776 
1 reel(s)

Dr. Richard Price was a Welch moral and political philosopher who was strongly opposed to the war with the American colonies. In 1776, he published a pamphlet entitled Observations on Civil Liberty and the Justice and Policy of the War with America. John Lind was a young lawyer and pamphleteer who opined that the Americans were treacherous individuals rather than states. He also mocked the colonists for failing to free their slaves while supposedly believing in the equality of all mankind. He also wrote Answer to the Declaration of the American Congress in 1776.

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Liston Papers.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England: Microform Academic Publishers, 1990
British Records Relating to America in Microform
4 reel(s)

This collection consists of the papers of Sir Robert Liston (1742-1836), diplomat, and owner of Millburn Tower, Gogar, Edinburgh, and his wife Henrietta (1752-1826). A self-made man, Richard became a diplomat because of his linguistic skills. In 1796 he became the British Minister to the United States and that same year married Henrietta Marchant. In the United States Richard dealt with Presidents George Washington and John Adams to implement the Jay Treaty, promote trade, secure repayment of debt, and discourage impressment of British soldiers. The papers include dispatches to Lord Grenville, discussions of the Indian chief Joseph Brant, and the journals of Henrietta which cover their travels throughout the United States.

FILM BOOK 0256 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

The Liston papers, 1796-1800, in the National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh : [guide] PDF

The guide includes an introduction to the collection, a bibliography, and a reel-by-reel description. Also available under call number DA512.L5 A4 1990.

Material Relating to the American Revolution from the Auckland Papers in the British Museum (Add Mss 34412-17).

Yorkshire, Eng: EP Microform Ltd, 1974
British records relating to America in microform
5 reel(s)

William Eden (1744-1814), first Baron of Auckland, took an interest in American affairs perhaps because his elder brother, Robert, was governor of Maryland. After the Declaration of Independence, Eden was in charge of British espionage. Dr. Bancroft, secretary to the American commissioners at Versailles, informed him about the diplomatic activities of Franklin and Deane. The loyalists Paul Wentworth and the Rev. John Vardill, also provided information. His brother-in-law, Hugh Elliot, British ambassador at Berlin, raided the correspondence of the American mission to the Prussian court. Eden later helped draft conciliation proposals that offered the Americans their demands on taxation and autonomy in exchange for their continued union under the Crown. Eden accepted appointment as a member of the Carlisle Commission that went to America in 1778 to offer the proposal. The proposal, however, was consistently rejected by the American Congress. Papers which relate to these events are arranged chronologically.

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Guides:

Material Relating to the American Revolution From the Auckland Papers in the British Museum PDF

Martin, George, Solicitor. Diary of George Martin, 1779-1800.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng: Micro Methods, 1964 
British records relating to America in microfilm
1 reel(s)

John Martin immigrated to America from Dublin in the middle of the eighteenth century. He acquired property in Virginia and passed it on to two of his sons. One of these sons, Samuel, returned to live in England while retaining ownership of property in Goochland and Albemarle counties. This document, rather than being a true diary, is a record of a series of claims advanced by Samuel and his son, George, in order to secure compensation for the loss of their Virginia properties during the American War for Independence. The material contains detailed information about the estates and about losses in shipping sustained by the family. The claims were presented to both the British Commissioner of Claims and the Virginia General Assembly.

An introduction at the beginning of the reel contains background information on the Martin family, a general description of the diary contents, and a brief bibliography.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Murdin, Cornelius. Three Sermons.

Southampton: T. Baker (Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago; 1966.), 1779
1 reel(s)

The author was a vicar and preached these anti-American independence sermons in the parish churches of Twyford and Ouzlebury, Hampshire.

Title continues “I. Liberty When Used as a Cloke [sic] of Maliciousness, the Worst of Evils. II. The Evil of Rebellion, as Applicable to American Conduct, Considered. III. Great Britain Oppressing America, A Groundless Charge.” ON THE REEL ENTITLED “A LETTER TO THE WHIGS.”
NOT IN MERLIN

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North Carolina. Declaration of Independence by the Citizens of Mecklenburg County, on the 20th Day of May, 1775, with Accompanying Documents, and the Preceedings of the Cumberland Association.

Raleigh, NC: Lawrence & Lemay for Governor Montfort Stokes, 1831
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet contains the Mecklenburg Declaration of 1775, the certificates testifying to the circumstances attending the Declaration, and the proceedings of the Cumberland Association.

Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC

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Parker family. Parker Family Papers, 1760-1795.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1964
British records relating to America in microfilm
4 reel(s)

James Parker, a merchant of Norfolk, Virginia, fought as a captain in the British Army during the War for Independence. He was captured twice and held as a prisoner of war in France. The papers relate to his career in Virginia and his experiences during the war, and to the careers of his sons, Patrick and Charles. The letters discuss personal, political, and business matters. One group of papers deals with Parker’s claims for his lost American property. In addition, the papers contain such items as the Virginia Almanack for 1771, accounts and correspondence related to prize money, an account of Benedict Arnold’s attempted betrayal of the West Point Fort, and letters exchanged while James was a prisoner of war.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

The family papers of James Parker, 1760-1795 PDF

Pattison, James, 1724-1805. James Pattison Papers, 1777-1781, from the Library, Royal Artillery Institution, Woolwich, London, S.E. 18.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1963
British records relating to America in microfilm
1 reel(s)

James Pattison, a British army officer in the American War of Independence, was commander in New York from 1779 to 1780. In April of 1777, Pattison became colonel commandant of the 4th battalion of the Royal Artillery. In September he arrived in New York to assume command of the Royal Artillery, serving under Sir Henry Clinton, Sir Thomas Wilson, and Sir William Howe during their American campaigns. The papers include brigade and general orders giving details of military operations such as the strength and movements of British forces. Other registers record appointments, bills of lading, commissions, and passes. Pattison’s official correspondence contains accounts of military operations from October 1777, to January 1781. Papers related to his administration in New York provide insights into local history.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Guides:

The papers of James Pattison, 1777-1781 PDF

Pickering, Timothy, 1745-1829. Timothy Pickering Papers

Boston, Mass.: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1966 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. Microfilm publication. no. 2
69 reel(s)

Timothy Pickering served as postmaster general, secretary of war, and secretary of state under President George Washington. Later, as a Senator and Representative, he opposed the policies of President Thomas Jefferson and of James Madison. A leader of the extreme Federalists, Pickering urged New England's secession from the Union. The papers are a major part of Timothy Pickering's personal collection, dating from the Revolutionary period up to his retirement from public life in the 1820s. Principal correspondents include John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Fisher Ames, George Cabot, Alexander Hamilton, Stephen Higginson, Major Samuel Hodgdon, Colonel David Humphreys, John Jay, Rufus King, Henry Knox, James McHenry, John Marshall, William Vans Murray, Richard Peters, John Pickering, Charles Pinckney, William Smith, Jacob Wagner, George Washington, Timothy Williams, and Oliver Wolcott.

An uncataloged guide, Allis, Frederick S. Jr. (ed.), A Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Timothy Pickering Papers, is in the Special Collections Office. It provides a short biography, a summary of the reel contents for reels 1 through 4 and 63 through 69, and a supplemental list of correspondents. Also, SPEC-R F61.M41 58 Historical Index to the Pickering Papers provides a limited subject and more extensive personal name index to reels 5 through 62. Notations in the index indicate the subject content of each document. Reel 69 includes an additional index to personal names appearing in lists and registers not indexed in this second guide. Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. Microfilm publication. no. 2
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Ramsay, Allan. Thoughts on the Origin and Nature of Government, Occasioned by the Late Disputes Between Great Britain and Her American Colonies.

London: 1796 
1 reel(s)

This book discusses whether Great Britain has the right to tax her American colonies.

Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL.
This reel also contains three pamphlets: “Candid Thoughts,” “A Letter to the Rev. Dr. Price” by James Stewart, and “A Letter to the Rev. Dr. Cooper.” See their separate entries for more information.

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Sargent, Winthrop, 1753-1820. Winthrop Sargent Papers.

Boston, Mass.: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1965 
7 reel(s)

Winthrop Sargent of Massachusetts served in the Revolutionary Army, helped found the Ohio Company, and participated in General St. Clair's disastrous expedition against the Indians in 1791. He later served as Governor of the Mississippi Territory. His personal interests ranged from meteorology and geology, to botany, horticulture, and archaeology. His papers include a biography of his life by Benjamin Harrison Pershing, diaries and orderly books of the St. Clair expedition, correspondence of Sargent's survey trips to Ohio and the formation of the Ohio Company, correspondence (1789-1801) covering his activities as secretary of the Northwest Territory and administrator of the Mississippi Territory, his return to Philadelphia and Boston, and his later retirement in Natchez. Principal correspondents include Gilbert and John Aspinwall, Manassah Cutler, Samuel Hodgdon, Richard Platt, and James Wilkinson.

An uncataloged guide, Allis, Frederick S. Jr. (ed.). Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Winthrop Sargent Papers is available in the Special Collections Office.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Seabury, Samuel. Congress Canvassed: Or, an Examination into the Conduct of the Delegates, at Their Grand Convention, Held in Philadelphia, Sept. 1, 1774.

New York: James Rivington, 1774

Seabury (1729-1796) was an Episcopalian minister who later became the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. He was an opponent of American independence during the Revolution and wrote a series of pamphlets attacking those in favor of freedom from England. This pamphlet is “a brilliant attack on the first Continental Congress, showing the illogic of the arguments that the king and his ministers are evil and the Parliament good, and correctly predicting that the Parliament would eventually back the king and that war would result. Alexander Hamilton's first work, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress, &c., written while he was only seventeen years of age, was published in response to Seabury’s first pamphlet, ‘Free Thoughts . . .,’ and indeed Seabury notes in a postscript that he is ‘neither frightened nor disconcerted by it.’ Seabury was perhaps the pre-eminent exponent of Tory thought in America at the time, and the political exchanges between Seabury and Hamilton were some of the most contentious of the Revolutionary era.” (From Resource Books, LLC)

(Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC.)
Note: “Signed A.W. Farmer,” this work is sometimes erroneously attributed to Isaac Wilkins. Addressed to the merchants of New York. "Postscript" on page 28 dated Dec. 16, 1774, in response to Alexander Hamilton's “Full Vindication of the Measures of the Congress.”

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Seabury, Samuel. Free Thoughts, on the Proceedings of the Continental Congress, Held at Philadelphia, Sept. 5, 1774.

 

New York: James Rivington, 1774 
1 reel(s)

This was Seabury’s first pamphlet of four attacking the Continental Congress and the proponents of American independence. Alexander Hamilton's first work, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress, &c., written while he was only seventeen years of age, was published in response to this pamphlet.

(Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC.)
Note: Title continues “Wherein their errors are exhibited, their reasonings confuted, and the fatal tendency of their non-importation, non-exportation, and non-consumption measures, are laid open to the plainest understandings; and the only means pointed out for preserving and securing our present happy constitution: In a letter to the farmers, and other inhabitants of North America in general, and to those of the province of New-York in particular.” Signed “A.W. Farmer,” this work is sometimes erroneously attributed to Isaac Wilkins.

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Seabury, Samuel. View of the Controversy, Etc., in a Letter to the Author of a Full Vindication, Etc.

New York: James Rivington, 1774 
1 reel(s)

This was Seabury’s third pamphlet in a vitriolic exchange with Alexander Hamilton. In 1774, Hamilton had published A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress, &c., prompting this Loyalist response by Seabury. The following year Hamilton responded in The Farmer Refuted: Or, a More Impartial and Comprehensive View of the Dispute Between Great-Britain and the Colonies. The printer, James Rivington, had his press seized by Capt. Isaac Sears after publishing Hamilton’s rejoinder.

(Microfilmed by the Library of Congress, Washington, DC.)
Note: Title in its entirety reads “A view of the controversy between Great-Britain and her colonies: Including a mode of determining their present disputes, finally and effecually [sic]; and of preventing all future contentions: In a letter, to the author of A full vindication of the measures of the Congress, from the calumnies of their enemies.” Signed “A.W. Farmer,” this work is sometimes erroneously attributed to Isaac Wilkins.

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Serle, Ambrose. Americans Against Liberty, or an Essay on the Nature and Principles of True Freedom.

London: 1775 
1 reel(s)

Serle (1742–1812) was a British civil servant and secretary to Lord Howe from 1776 to 1778. Commissioner in the British government Transport Office, and hymnist. This work is critical of America’s continued use of slaves and its desire for independence from Britain.

Title continues “Shewing [sic] that the designs and conduct of the Americans tend only to tyranny and slavery.”

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Sharp, Granville. Defence of the Ancient, Legal, and Constitutional, Right of the People, to Elect Representatives for Every Session of Parliament.

London: Galabin and Baker, 1780 
1 reel(s)

Sharp (1735-1813) was an English scholar, philanthropist, and advocate for the abolition of slavery. He also sympathized with the American colonists’ revolt against British rule. This work is about representation in the British government, writs, Parliament, and constitutional law.

Second edition. Title continues “viz. not only ‘every year once,’ but also ‘more often if need be:’ As expressly required in the old statute, and confirmed by the general usage of ancient times, demonstrated by the evidence of the original writs for election: in a letter to a member of the Surry Committee.” Sharp’s “A circular letter to the several petitioning counties, cities and towns, addressed to their respective general meetings, against the late proposition for a triennial election of representatives” is at the end of this reel.
Microfilmed by the Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, CA

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Smith, Hezekiah, 1737-1835. [Journals, 1762-1805, Papers, Addresses to the Army, Etc.].

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress for the Southern Baptist Conventions, Historical Commission, 1955 
1 reel(s)

Hezekiah Smith, a Baptist clergyman of Haverhill, Massachusetts, is associated with the founding and development of Rhode Island College, later known as Brown University. He acted as a chaplain from 1775 to 1780 in the Continental Army. His journals, arranged chronologically, record the dates and locations of his sermons and details of troop movements during the Revolutionary War. Also included are General Gate's army orders, a list of army chaplains in 1778, and other manuscript addresses and sermons delivered to the army.

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Smith, Hezekiah. Papers of Hezekiah Smith, 1762-1805

1 reel(s)

Smith (1737-1805) was a Baptist minister who served as Chaplain of the American army from 1776 to 1780. He became friends with George Washington and gave encouragement and support to the troops. He later established and supported Brown University. There are 12 sets of papers with a number of letters and an additional address to the Army at the end. No. 1: Oct. 29, 1762-April 19, 1764. No. 2: April 19, 1764-Oct. 4, 1764. No. 3: Oct. 6, 1764-Feb. 10, 1767. No. 4: March 16, 1767-Sept. 30, 1769. No. 5: Oct. 1, 1769-Sept. 25, 1773. No. 6: March 18, 1776-Jan. 1, 1777. No. 7: June 17, 1777-April 6, 1779. No. 8: April 16, 1779-Dec. 12, 1779. No. 9: Dec. 1780-Aug. 1788. No. 10: June 17, 1789-Dec., 1798. No. 10: June 17, 1789-Dec. 1798. No. 11: Jan. 1779-Jan. 15, 1805. Also includes Chaplain Smith's list of Major Generals, Brigadiers, Chaplains, etc. in the American Army, Aug. 17, 1778; a sermon composed to deliver in Gallows Hill previous to the execution of eleven criminals Aug. 17, 1778; Chaplain Smith's sermon to the American Army, Oct. 18, 1778; a sermon composed to deliver at the execution of Josiah Edwards on Gallows Hill; Nov. 12, 1779, not delivered for want of time; Chaplain Smith's address to the American Army on swearing, July 31, 1779; address to the American Army, Oct. 17, 1779; a number of letters and another address to the Army, June 1779.

Manuscript; 1762-1805

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State Slavery Statutes.

Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1989 
354 fiche

This collection includes over 7, 100 state statutes regarding slavery dating from 1789 to 1865 in the United States. Included is every statute passed in the fifteen slave states that dealt with slavery, free blacks, and the broader issue of race. Also included are private laws, special acts, legislative resolutions, and texts of state constitutions and subsequent revisions as they affected slavery. These documents depict how the legislators of the American South maintained slavery from the time of the American Revolution when most of the northern states had abolished slavery to the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, as well how slavery affected virtually everything legislators did in the South.

MICF 6044

Guides:

State slavery statutes : guide to the microfiche collection

Guide includes inventory listing and subject, name, and geographic location index.

Stewart, James. Letter to the Rev. Dr. Price.

London: 1776
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet is critical of Richard Price’s principles and reasoning on the nature of civil liberty and free will.

Note: Located on the reel labeled “Ramsay, Allan.”

Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL.

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United States. Adjutant General’s Office. General Index to Compiled Military Service Records of Revolutionary War Soldiers.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1942 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 515; v. National Archives record group 93. 
58 reel(s)

Arranged by surname, the index gives the name and unit of a soldier or civilian and sometimes his rank, profession, or office. The index may refer to more than one jacket or envelope if a soldier served in more than one unit. Besides soldiers, the entries include sailors, members of army staff departments, and civilian employees, such as teamsters, laundresses, carpenters, and cooks. The compiled service records to which this index refers is reproduced in the collection, Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served in the American Army During the Revolutionary War, (National Archives M 881), which is not presently owned by Ellis Library.

The National Archives catalog, Microform Resources for Research now lists this collection as Microcopy no. M 860

FILM 9:5-6 - Request access

Guides:

United States. National Archives and Records Administration. Military service records : a select catalog of National Archives microfilm publications.

The guide provides background on the various collections and indicates the alphabetical range for each reel.

United States. Adjutant General’s Office. Index to Compiled Military Service Records of Revolutionary War Naval Personnel.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1943 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 516. 
1 reel(s)

There are approximately 1,000 cards that have been filmed for this collection, each giving the name of a sailor or civilian employee. Rank of profession is sometimes given, typically as seaman, surgeon, lieutenant, pilot, quartermaster, carpenter, or midshipman. Cross references refer to the correct envelope for variant spellings. The names in this index are duplicated in the general index, General Index to Compiled Military Service of Revolutionary War Soldiers (National Archives T 515, renumbered M 860).

The National Archives catalog, Microform Resources for Research now lists this collection as Microcopy no. M 879

FILM 9:6 - Request access

Guides:

United States. National Archives and Records Administration. Military service records : a select catalog of National Archives microfilm publications.

The guide provides background on the various collections and indicates the alphabetical range for each reel.

United States. Adjutant General’s Office. Index to Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers Who Served During the Revolutionary War in Organizations from the State of North Carolina.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1958 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 257; v. National Archives record group 93
2 reel(s)

This collection contains an index card for each individual for whom there are records of service as a volunteer in the Revolutionary War. The cards are arranged alphabetically by name. The introductory pamphlet explains how to locate additional information for any particular individual in the card index.

An uncataloged pamphlet describing the collection is available in the Special Collections Office. At the beginning of the first reel there is reprint of the introductory pamphlet.

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United States. Continental Congress. Miscellaneous Papers of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1962 
National Archives microfilm publication. Microcopy co. M 332; v. National Archives record group 360.
9 reel(s)

This collection includes items not part of the main body of records reproduced as Papers of the Continental Congress (M 247). These miscellaneous papers, dated mostly from 1774 to 1789, are arranged by type of document such as dispatches, letters, credentials, and other papers, and then alphabetically by author or subject. The material includes information on foreign affairs, fiscal problems, naval affairs, cessions of western lands, the credentials of delegates to the Continental Congress, and papers relating to particular states. Specifically, the collection contains diplomatic dispatches from John Adams, William Carmichael, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, John de Neufville, and others, as well as correspondence relating to Spain and the Barbary States.

An uncataloged guide, Miscellaneous Papers of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, is available in the Special Collections Office. This guide contains information on the arrangement of the material and a description of the contents of each reel.

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United States. Continental Congress. Papers of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1959 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 247; v. National Archives record group 360.
204 reel(s)

From its first meeting in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774, to discuss common grievances against the British, the Continental Congress functioned as the first national government until the implementation of the Constitution in 1789. This collection includes material on foreign affairs, fiscal affairs, military and naval problems, and a postal system. The Congress struggled to fight the Revolution, solicit foreign assistance from European powers, and, after the Treaty of Paris in 1783, conduct domestic and foreign affairs under the Articles of Confederation. Finally, to overcome the weaknesses of the Articles government, a new constitution was ratified after a bitter battle between Federalists and anti-Federalists. This new instrument of government replaced the Continental Congress in 1789.

An uncataloged guide, Papers of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, is available in the Special Collections Office. The guide contains background information on the collection, titles of related documents, an annotated table of reel contents, and an index to the entire collection.

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United States. Supreme Court. Revolutionary War Prize Cases: Records of the Court of Appeals in Cases of Capture 1776-1787.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1954 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 162; v. National Archives record group 267
15 reel(s)

Reproduced are records of prize cases heard on appeal from colonial and state courts by committees of the Continental Congress and by the Court of Appeals in cases of capture. The cases constitute a valuable source of documentary material for the maritime and commercial history of the Revolutionary War and for the development of admiralty law. The printed guide indexes by claimant, appellant and name of ship, and lists appeal-committee members.

An uncataloged guide, Revolutionary War Prize Cases, is available in the Special Collections Office, and is also reproduced on the first reel.

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United States. War Department. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1957 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 246; v. National Archives record group 93
138 reel(s)

The service records for regiments, companies, battalions, and militias in Connecticut, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Continental troops are filmed. The records are arranged by state and then by unit. The company commander and his dates of command are given. Muster rolls, payrolls, and miscellaneous other company records are filmed.

Military Service Records: a Select Catalog of National Archives Microfilm Publications. Also, the first reel is an index arranged by state, regiment (or other grouping), and jacket (envelope) number.

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Guides:

United States. National Archives and Records Administration. Military service records : a select catalog of National Archives microfilm publications.

The guide provides background on the various collections and indicates the alphabetical range for each reel.

Wales and America: American Material from the National Library of Wales.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England: Microform, 1984
British Records Relating to America in Microform
19 reel(s)

This collection contains a wide selection of items, relating to links between Wales and America. The material is divided into ten consecutive sections ranging from “The Colonial Years, 1600-1800” to a section on literary connections between the two countries. Section three is devoted to material relating to the legend of the Welsh prince Madoc who is said to have discovered America in the twelfth century. It contains transcripts from the papers of Sir Walter Raleigh and Sir John Hawkins concerning the legend. Within the other sections the researcher will encounter such subjects as colonial taxation and trade, the Revolutionary War, Welsh emigration to America, the Civil War, slavery, and David Lloyd George. Also included is material relating to the Welsh cultural festival of the Eisteddfod.

FILM 22:12 - Request access

Guides:

Taylor, Clare. Wales and America : American material from the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth PDF

The guide contains notes on the provenance of each of the sections. It also includes a complete annotated list of the records as they appear on the microfilm. Also available under call numberE184.W4 T38 1984.

Washington, George, 1732-1799. George Washington Papers.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1961 
Presidential papers microfilm
124 reel(s)

The Washington papers, numbering 64,786 pages, were arranged in eight series: 1) Exercise books and diaries (1741-99), 2) Letterbooks (1754-99), 3) Varick transcripts (1775-83), 4) General correspondence (1697-1799), 5) Financial papers (1750-96), 6) Military papers (1755-98), 7) Applications (1789-96), and 8) Miscellaneous papers (1775-99). The material deals with Washington's relations with the Continental Congress, his command of the Continental Army, his presidency, and other aspects of his career. Principal correspondents include Benedict Arnold, Clement Biddle, George and James Clinton, Bartholomew Dandridge, Horatio Gates, Nathanael Greene, Alexander Hamilton, Robert Harrison, William Heath, Robert Howe, David Humphreys, Thomas Jefferson, Henry Knox, Lafayette, Tobias Lear, Henry Lee Jr., Benjamin Lincoln, William Livingston, Alexander McDougall, James McHenry, William Maxwell, Robert Morris, Stephen Moylan, Samuel Parsons, Timothy Pickering, Israel Putman, Edmund Randolph, Joseph Reed, Rochambeau, Philip Schuyler, Charles Scott, John Sullivan, Benjamin Tallmadge, and Jonathan Trumbull.

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Guides:

Library of Congress. Manuscript Division. Index to the George Washington papers

This name index lists names of writers and recipients of letters. Diaries, general orders, and survey records are indexed under President Washington’s name.

Wykeham Martin Papers: Material Relating to the Problems of Settlement in America, Especially After the War of Independence.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1969 
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

In 1649, along with other cavaliers, John Culpeper was granted the Northern Neck in Virginia by Charles II. At the Restoration in 1660 he returned to England. When he died the same year, the estates passed to the related Fairfax, Martin, and Wykeham families. Papers of these families illustrate the difficulties inherent in owning American property after the American Revolution. The focus of this series is the large property in Virginia, which finally escheated (reverted to the government) after the war. The papers include family correspondence dealing mostly with the finances of the estate (rents, debts, revenues) and with the attempts to regain the property after the War of Independence. Some of the letters describe current events like the wars with the French in the 1740's and 1750's, the unrest in America after the Stamp Act, Indian incursions, the Jacobite rebellion in Scotland in 1745/46.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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