Skip to main content

Black Studies Microforms

Abolition & Emancipation. Part 1: Papers of Thomas Clarkson, William Lloyd Garrison, Zachary Macaulay, Harriet Martineau, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Wilberforce from the Huntington Library

Wiltshire, England: Adam Matthew Publications, 1996
10 reel(s)

Correspondence, reports, printed materials, manuscript essays, journals, diaries of leading abolitionists in the United States and Britain, dating from 1773 to 1899. Thomas Clarkson (1760-1846), along with William Wilberforce (1759-1833), founded the British Anti-Slavery Society in 1787 and witnessed the passage of British Anti-Slavery laws in 1807 and the abolition of slavery in British Colonies in 1833. Correspondence from both men are reproduced as well as Clarkson's manuscript essays. Zachary Macaulay (1768-1838) was especially active in the Sierra Leone colony founded by Wilberforce. An extensive collection of letters by Macaulay are included. Political economist Harret Martineau (1802-1876) was a leading abolitionist in Britain; letters and manuscript essays written by Martineau are included. William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) founded the influential newspaper The Liberator in 1831 and the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1834. Letters from Garrison, including some to Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Pease, are reproduced here. Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), best known as the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, was a prolific writer in the second half of the nineteenth century. Correspondence and manuscripts of a full range of her writings are included.

Guide includes detailed listing of contents with brief extracts and brief biographies. The digital version of the guide is available online at http://www.adam-matthew-publications.co.uk/digital_guides/abolition_emancipation_part_1.

FILM BOOK 0320 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Abolition & emancipation : a listing and guide to part … of the microfilm collection.

Abstracts of Jamaica Wills, 1625-1792, in the British Museum.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng: E.P. Microform, 1972
1 reel(s)

This collection of 312 abstracts of wills of English colonists or landholders in Jamaica during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was abstracted by Verona I.C. Smith (Mrs. Sidney Smith). Her collection spans the rise and maturation of the Jamaica sugar industry and constitutes a prime source for the social historian. Most of the testators were big planters or merchants. The wills record the names of the testator, beneficiaries, executors, and witnesses, the date of the will, the residence and occupation of the testator, and the disposition of the estate. The wills throw light on the social composition of the Jamaican planter class, its wealth and familial ties as well as on race relations in colonial Jamaica.

A description of contents and arrangement is at the beginning of the reel. An index is at the end of the reel

FILM 22:2 - Request access

Anti-Abolition Tracts. No. 1-6, 1862-66.

New York: Van Evrie, Horton, 1862
1 reel(s)

The anti-abolition tracts in this collection are Abolition and Secession (1864), Free Negroism (1862), The Abolition Conspiracy to Destroy the Union (1863) The Negro's Place in Nature (1864) The Six Species of Men (1866), and Soliloquies of the Bondholder, the Poor Mechanic, the Poor Farmer, the Freed Negro, the Soldier's Widow, the 'Radical' Congressman, the Political Preacher, the Returned Soldier, the Southerner (1866).

A guide in the Special Collections Office lists the complete titles.

FILM MISC - Request access

Anti-Slavery Propaganda in the Oberlin College Library.

Louisville, Ky.: Lost Cause, 1968
7500 card(s)

Oberlin College Library's collection of American anti-slavery propaganda includes over 2500 pamphlets covering annual reports, proceedings, platforms, and addresses of anti-slavery societies published before the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. In 1835 Oberlin College, a center of anti-slavery activity, first admitted blacks as students. The collection is arranged by main entry, generally author. The first microcard for each title includes eye-legible bibliographic data in the form of a catalog card. Each title is fully described in Ellis Library's card catalog.

An uncataloged guide, Anti-Slavery Propaganda in the Oberlin College Library, available in the Special Collections Office, lists the titles included in the collection.

MICD 326

Birmingham Female Society for the Relief of Negro Slaves. Records Relating to the Birmingham Ladies Society for the Relief of British Negro Slaves.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1970
British records relating to America in microfilm
2 reel(s)

In the early nineteenth century, Birmingham was an important center of anti-slavery activity. Birmingham itself was a prosperous manufacturing town engaged in some cotton trading. Joseph Sturge, one of the leaders in the British anti-slavery movement, was secretary of the Birmingham anti-slavery society and active in several national anti-slavery organizations. On April 8, 1825, Lucy Townsend and Mary Lloyd founded the Birmingham Ladies Society, which published several pamphlets, compiled annual reports, and recorded minutes relating to their activities. Members wrote letters and petitions urging others to support their cause. They supported education as a means of solving the problem of freed slaves, focusing on aid to blacks in British territories. They were reluctant to deal with the problem of American slavery for fear of inflaming the issue.

A description of the contents and their arrangement is on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 22:3 - Request access

Bryce, James Bryce , Viscount, 1838-1922. James Bryce, Viscount Bryce of Dechmont, American Correspondence, 1871-1922.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1964
British records relating to America in microform
7 reel(s)

James Bryce, jurist, historian, and politician, was a member of Parliament from 1880 to 1906 and a member of three cabinets. He first visited the United States in 1871 and last in 1921. His knowledge of the United States is reflected in his book, The American Commonwealth, published in 1888. As British ambassador to the United States from 1907 to 1913, he singled out as his most important task the furtherance of good relations between Britain and the United States. Topics discussed in his papers include various presidential campaigns and elections, tariffs, the Negro problem, civil service reform, Canadian-American relations, international copyright legislation, American city government, the Armenian question, the Irish question, women’s suffrage, the Venezuela crisis, German propaganda, maritime disputes, and the League of Nations.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears on the first reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 22:5 - Request access

Buckley-Mathew, George Benvenuto. Buckley-Mathew Collection.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1967
British records relating to America in microform
1 reel(s)

These ninety-one letters were mainly addressed to Sir George Buckley-Matthew (1807-1879), a British diplomat. Of particular interest is the period during which he served as British consul in Charleston, South Carolina (1850-1853), and Philadelphia (1853-1856). A number of the letters discuss the capture of free West Indian Negro seamen and their sale in the southern United States. Many of the letters were written by British and American statesmen and diplomats. One from William Gladstone concerns Mathew’s resignation of his consular post at the request of the United States government after he attempted to recruit Americans for service in the Crimean War.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is on the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 22:5 - Request access

Collins, Doctor, a.k.a. “A Professional Planter.” Practical Rules for Management and Medical Treatment of Negro Slaves in the Sugar Colonies.

London: J. Barfield, 1811 
1 reel(s)

There are two parts to this book of advice for slaveholders in the British sugar colonies. Part 1 deals with the general management of slaves. Part 2 deals with how to treat various illnesses and diseases that may affect them. There is an appendix at the end with lists of drugs, medical instruments, weights and measures, and prepared compositions.

(Microfilmed by Southwestern Microfilm, Inc., Dallas, TX.)

FILM MISC - Request access

AVAILABLE ONLINE

Davenport, William, 1725-1797. Papers of William Davenport & Co., 1745-1797.

Wakefield, England: Microform Academic Publishers, 1998
British Records Relating to America in Microform
3 reel(s)

These records, accounts, papers, and ledgers give details on a wide range of issues relating to Davenport’s role as a specialist slave trader in eighteenth-century Britain. They include the costs of outfitting voyages, suppliers of trade goods, shareholding of investors, the number, age, and sex of slaves delivered, and the financial settlements at the end of voyages. His accounts give insights into the impact of geographical change in patterns of slaving in Africa on profits in the British slave trade between the 1750s and 1780s.

FILM BOOK 0322 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Richardson, David. The papers of William Davenport & Co., (1745-1797) : a brief introduction to the microfilm edition of the William Davenport papers PDF

The guide contains a brief biography of Davenport, contents of the three reels, and bibliological references. (Filmed from the collection owned by Keele University Library, Special Collections and Archives, Staffordshire, England). Available under call number HT1161 .R53 1998.

Dromgoole, Edward 1751-1815. Edward Dromgoole Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library.

Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina, 1966 
4 reel(s)

Edward Dromgoole (1751-1815) was a merchant, planter, and Methodist preacher in Brunswick County, Virginia. One son, Edward Dromgoole Jr. (1788-1840), was a physician, planter, merchant, and Methodist preacher. The other son, George Coke Dromgoole (1797-1847), was a lawyer, planter, and political figure of Brunswick County. The first group of papers, those of Edward Dromgoole, Sr., and his son, Edward, from 1770 to 1830, are valuable for the study of the early Methodist movement in America. Religious problems are discussed, including the controversy among Methodists regarding slavery. The papers also discuss the western movement of settlers, the attitude of those settlers toward slavery, and free Negroes in Ohio. The George Coke Dromgoole papers (1830-1848) were written by a wide circle of political and business friends and reflect their opinions on railroads in the 1830s, Texas annexation, the Mexican War, the political campaigns from 1840 to 1847, and other political activity. Well-known correspondents in these papers include John Wesley, Francis Asbury, Silas Wright, and Thomas Hart Benton.

An uncataloged guide, The Edward Dromgoole Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library, available in the Special Collections Office, provides background, a list of correspondents, and reel notes.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Ferrar, Nicholas. Ferrar Papers, 1590 to 1790: in Magdalene College, Cambridge.

East Ardsley, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England: Academic Microform Publishers, 1992
British Records Relating to America
14 reel(s)

Over 3,000 letters and business papers of the family of Nicholas Ferrar (died 1620) make up this collection, The business archive of the Virginia Company of London and its subordinate, the Somer Islands Company, formed the beginning of the collection. In 1625 the family moved from London to their Huntingdonshire manor, Little Gidding, and family correspondence from Mrs. Ferrar and her two sons, Nicholas and John make up the bulk of the collection. The letters continue with correspondence of various Ferrar descendents, including Susanna Collett and her five eldest daughters. In addition to correspondence, the collection includes prints purchased in Nicholas Ferrar’s travels from 1613 to 1617. Correspondence includes the Woodnoth, Brooke, Fielding, Barridge, and Cave families.

FILM 22:6 - Request access

Guides:

The Ferrar papers, 1590-1790, in Magdalene College, Cambridge.

The guide consists of an introduction and finding list by David Ransome, in addition to genealogical charts of the Ferrar family.

Gale-Morant Papers, 1731-1925

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng: EP Microfilm Limited, 1977
British records relating to America
2 reel(s)

The Gale and Morant families went to Jamaica in the seventeenth century. Over several generations they acquired sugar plantations and slaves. The papers concern family and business affairs from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, with a concentration of materials for the period from 1765 to 1835. The papers shed light on slavery and the life and work on Jamaican sugar estates. A great deal of information is recorded on the lists of slaves, such as age, country of origin, occupation, physical condition, and value. Sex ratios, age distribution, and the number of births and deaths can be derived from using these records. Also included are letters concerning plantation livestock, shipments of sugar and rum, crop accounts, deeds, bonds, and wills.

Guides:

The Gale-Morant papers, 1731-1925 PDF

An uncataloged guide, The Gale-Morant Papers, is also available in the Special Collections Office.

FILM 22:6 - Request access

Harper, Robert Goodloe, 1765-1825. Robert Goodloe Harper Family Papers, Ms. 431 in the Maryland Historical Society.

Baltimore, Md.: Maryland Historical Society, 1970
5 reel(s)

Robert Goodloe Harper was a congressman and Baltimore lawyer. He served briefly in the North Carolina state legislature and soon was elected to the United States Congress. He served as chair of the Ways and Means Committee from 1747 to 1801. In 1799 he moved to Baltimore and was chosen to represent Maryland in the Senate in 1816. While in the Senate he ran for vice-president as a Federalist. Much of the correspondence concerns political topics. However, a significant amount deals with Harper's role in efforts to establish colonies for blacks in Ohio and Africa. He was an influential member of the Maryland State Colonization Society and proposed the name "Liberia" for the settlement in Africa.

An uncataloged guide, Marks, Bayly Ellen. Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Robert Goodloe Harper Papers, is in the Special Collections Office provide a description of the contents for each reel, a biographical sketch, a bibliography of Harper's published works, and information in the provenance of the collection.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Long, Edward. Candid Reflections Upon the Judgment Lately Awarded by the Court of King’s Bench, in Westminster-Hall, on What is Commonly Called the Negroe-Cause, by a Planter.

Long, Edward.

London: 1772 
1 reel(s)

This pro-slavery pamphlet argues that slaves from the West Indies should not be emancipated when brought into Great Britain.

FILM MISC - Request access

Martin, Samuel. The Papers of Samuel Martin, 1694/5-1776, Relating to Antigua

3 reel(s)

Samuel Martin was an eighteenth-century civic leader and plantation owner on the island of Antigua. His views on plantation management, including the treatment of slaves and land use, were progressive compared those held by his contemporaries. Martin advocated for better treatment of slaves, arguing that a healthy and well trained slave would make plantations more successful. Martin also supported better use of farmland, including crop rotation. Active in the public life of Antigua, Martin served as speaker of the assembly and colonel of the militia. “The papers include the commercial, political and personal lives of the Martin family of Antigua and county Berkshire from the mid-eighteenth through the last nineteenth centuries. Volumes included in this microfilm edition are the letter books of Samuel Martin (1694/5-1776), and related documents. The core of this collection are the six volumes of Martin’s outgoing correspondence, beginning with his return to Antigua in 1750, after many years residence in England, and ending with his death in 1776.” The collection is an “important source for the study of eighteenth-century West Indian planters, and of the island societies which they shaped and were shaped by at the height of the era of sugar and slavery” — p 4, Guide

FILM BOOK 0476 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Zacek, Natalie. The papers of Samuel Martin, 1694/5-1776, relating to Antigua [microform] : from the collections of the British Library.  East Ardsley, Wakefield : Microform Academic Publishers, 2010. PDF

Also available under call number SPEC REF  F2035 .M377 2010

Memminger, Christopher Gustav, 1803-1888. Christopher Gustavus Memminger Papers.

Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Library, 1966 
1 reel(s)

Christopher G. Memminger was a South Carolina politician who became heavily involved in the secession controversy in 1860. He chaired the committee that drafted the new constitution of the Confederate States of America in 1861 and he served as secretary of the treasury in the cabinet of Jefferson Davis. After the Civil War, he returned to Charleston where he practiced law and helped develop the state's public school system. This collection of his papers dates from 1803 to 1915, but most heavily concentrates on the period from 1858 to 1868. It includes a number of official reports submitted by Memminger as treasury secretary to the Confederate Congress. It also includes papers on the "slave problem" and Reconstruction. The material is arranged chronologically and includes a few papers from Memminger's son, Thomas B. Memminger.

An uncataloged guide, Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Christopher G. Memminger Papers, is available in the Special Collection office. The guide contains background information on Christopher Memminger and the collection.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Napton, William Barclay William Barclay Napton Papers

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Libraries, 
2 reel(s)

William Barclay Napton moved to Fayette, Missouri, in 1832 to practice law. He was appointed attorney general of the state by Governor Boggs in 1836. He remained in that position until 1851. As a leader of the pro-slavery forces in western Missouri, he helped organize the pro-slavery convention at Lexington in 1855. He was appointed to the State Supreme Court in 1857 but was forced to retire in 1861. Reappointed to the high court in 1873, he served until 1880. This collection contains letters from his wife (1858-1861), writings from his student days at Princeton (1825-1829), and diaries that he kept from 1863 to 1883.

NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. Papers of the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society.

Philadelphia, Pa.: Rhistoric Publications, 1969
5 reel(s)

The Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Kept in Bondage was the first society formed for the abolition of slavery. It was founded in 1775 in Philadelphia. Suspended during the Revolutionary War, the society was reactivated in 1787. Containing minutes and manuscripts from 1787 to 1816, the collection forms an extremely rich source for the study of the early abolitionist movement. The first reel contains the constitution and minutes of the society.

Reels 2-5 contain 11 volumes of manuscripts with an index for each volume. A manuscript history of the society, located at the end of the fifth reel, provides a chronological summary of important events and thus can be used as a guide to the collection.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Priestley, Joseph, 1733-1804. Letters to the Rev. Theophilus Lindsay and the Rev. Thomas Belsham, Deposited in Dr. William’s Library.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1965
British records relating to America in microfilm
1 reel(s)

Joseph Priestley, English clergyman, chemist, and physicist, moved to the United States in 1794. He lived in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, until his death in 1804. The letters were written to his friend, Theophilus Lindsay (1723-1808), a Unitarian minister closely associated with Priestley in England. The letters deal chiefly with religious ideas, activities, and writings, but Priestley makes observations on American politics, including the strength of Federalists and anti-Federalists and the intensity of American party feelings. References are made to George Washington, John Adams, the Jay Treaty, and Congress. Priestley also mentions the Alien and Sedition Laws, which he feared might apply to him. He comments on Negro emancipation, southern fears of slave insurrections, and American western expansion.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is on the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 22:10 - Request access

Guides:

The letters of Dr Joseph Priestley, 1766-1803 & 1789-1803 PDF

Pye, Henry James. Doubts Concerning the Legallity of Slavery in Any Part of the British Dominions.

London: 1774 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet deals with whether or not to abolish slavery in the West India Islands due to its illegality in the British Constitution.

Microfilmed by Yale University, New Haven, CT.

FILM MISC - Request access

Race, Slavery and Free Blacks, Series I: Petitions to Southern Legislatures, 1777-1867.

Bethesda, MD: University Publications of America, 1998 
Black Studies Research Sources
23 reel(s)

This collection contains all 2,917 extant legislative petitions on the subject of race, slavery, and free blacks in the South dating from 1777 to 1867. The petitions come from the following states: Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Written by slaveholders and nonslaveholders, blacks and whites, men and women, slaves and freemen, petitions include requests for emancipation, mass campaigns demanding the total abolition of slavery, and complaints about the activities of free blacks and address issues such as manumission, colonization, religion, laws governing slaves, racial mixing, and black military service. They provide a portrait of the political, legal, economic, social, and cultural life of the American South in the nineteenth century.

FILM BOOK 0319 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

A guide to the microfilm edition of Race, slavery, and free Blacks. Series I. Petitions to southern legislatures, 1777-1867

Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series II: Petitions to Southern County Courts 1775-1867.

Bethesda, MD: LexisNexis, 2002
Black Studies Research Sources
116 reel(s)

See also the website for the Race and Slavery Petitions Project:  http://library.uncg.edu/slavery_petitions/ (last accessed 4 October 2006).

Ellis Library has Parts A-E

FILM BOOK 0351 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution Through the Civil War: Series A, Selections from the South Carolina Library, University of South Carolina.

Frederick, Md: University Publications of America, 1985
41 reel(s)

James Henry Hammond, plantation owner, served in the House of Representatives (1835-1836), as Governor of South Carolina (1842-1844), and as United States Senator (1857-1860). His papers reflect his interest in scientific agriculture, providing information on cotton growing, fruit and vegetable production, and livestock management. Other subjects include social customs in the ante-bellum South, the state of education at the University of South Carolina, political ideology among educated southerners, the practice of law, and slave management. The miscellaneous collections include records of plantation owners from various South Carolina regions. Certain selections, such as the Wade Hampton papers dealing with sugar plantations in Louisiana, refer to the westward expansion of the plantation system in the nineteenth century. The correspondence offers insight into the social and family life of the South Carolina planter. Plantation journals and account books provide details on crop production and the work and health of plantation slaves.

FILM BOOK 0064 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Schipper, Martin Paul. Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War [guide] : series A, selections from the South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

The guide provides reel content notes.

Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations: Series B. Selections from the South Carolina Historical Society.

Frederick, Md.: University Publications of America, 1985 
10 reel(s)

Papers of families and individuals from the South Carolina low countries include a concentration of materials from St. John's Parish of the Charleston District. Included are the proceedings of the Black Oak Agricultural Society, the confession of a participant in the Denmark Vesey slave rebellion of 1822, the auction book of Charleston slave trader, Alonzo White, extensive slave records, a parish diary, and a number of plantation journals. The diaries, daybooks, plantation records, and estate accounts for the Thomas Porcher Ravenel family (1731-1899) are also included. These papers relate to lands, plantation management, slaves, and crops, especially rice and cotton.

FILM BOOK 0111 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Schipper, Martin Paul. Records of ante-bellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War [guide] : series A, selections from the South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina

The guide provides reel content notes.

Rhodes House Anti-Slavery Papers, Material Relating to America from the Anti-Slavery Collection in Rhodes House Oxford; Mainly 1839-1868.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Micro Methods, 1963 
British records relating to America in microfilm
2 reel(s)

This is a collection of the London Anti-Slavery Society (1823-1840), the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (founded 1839), and the Aborigines Protection Society. The latter two societies merged in 1909 to form the Anti-Slavery and Aborigines Protection Society. Originally, the Anti-Slavery Society concerned itself only with the abolition of slavery in the British sugar colonies. This achieved in 1838, they turned their attention to American slavery. The change in focus led to the founding of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, whose goal was the abolition of slavery throughout the world. British and American abolitionists cooperated to convince the British and the American public of the sinfulness of slavery. Selections relating to America are from the minutebooks, memorials, petitions, and correspondence of the society. The Rhodes House Library houses the largest anti-slavery collection in Great Britain.

A description of the collection and its arrangement is on the first reel. Also useful is SPEC-R Z1236 .C74 179 A Guide to Manuscripts Relating to America in Great Britain and Ireland. p. 205.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM 22:10 - Request access

South Carolina. Group of Pamphlets from the South Carolina Collection, 1822-1834.

Columbia, SC: South Caroliniana Library, 1973 
1 reel(s)

This collection covers the subjects of slavery, free people of color, reflections from a soldier of the Revolutionary War, slave insurrections, Baptist opinions on slavery, the Agricultural Society of South Carolina, the management of slaves and their religious instruction, and essays on the rights of sovereignty of the “Plantation States.”

There is an index in the form of a letter at the beginning of the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

FILM MISC - Request access

Southern Historical Manuscripts: Plantation Records, 1748-1901 from the Department of Archives, Louisiana State University.

Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1971 
526 fiche

Personal papers of southern families, both wealthy landowners and freed slaves, provide insights into everyday life in the South before and after the Civil War. The papers include diaries, land deeds, tax receipts, correspondence, bills and invoices, newspaper clippings, school programs, handbills, almanacs, account books, and pamphlets. Topics include life on the plantations, education and student life, financial transactions, agriculture, attitudes toward slavery, religious beliefs, health concerns, Civil War battles, and travel at home and abroad.

An uncataloged guide, Southern Historical Manuscripts: Plantation Records, 1748-1901 From the Department of Archives, Louisiana State University, located in the Special Collections Office, indicates holdings.

MICF 975

State Slavery Statutes.

Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, 1989 
354 fiche

This collection includes over 7, 100 state statutes regarding slavery dating from 1789 to 1865 in the United States. Included is every statute passed in the fifteen slave states that dealt with slavery, free blacks, and the broader issue of race. Also included are private laws, special acts, legislative resolutions, and texts of state constitutions and subsequent revisions as they affected slavery. These documents depict how the legislators of the American South maintained slavery from the time of the American Revolution when most of the northern states had abolished slavery to the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, as well how slavery affected virtually everything legislators did in the South.

MICF 6044

Guides:

State slavery statutes : guide to the microfiche collection

Guide includes inventory listing and subject, name, and geographic location index.

Taylor, Zachary, 1784-1850. Zachary Taylor Papers.

Washington, D.C: Library of Congress, 1958 
Presidential papers microfilm
2 reel(s)

Zachary Taylor, 12th president of the United States, distinguished himself in the War of 1812 and the Black Hawk, Seminole, and Mexican Wars. During his term as president, he presided over the ratification of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty and encouraged the admission of New Mexico and California as free states. His papers are organized in five series: 1) an autobiographical account, 2) general correspondence, 3) family papers related to the settlement of Taylor's estate, the life of Richard Taylor, his son, and the plantation in Louisiana, 4) miscellany, and 5) a memorial volume. Letters to Thomas S. Jesup from 1818 to 1840 relate largely to the Seminole Indian campaign in 1837 and 1838. Other correspondents include John M. Clayton, George W. Crawford, Jefferson Davis, James K. Polk, Thomas W. Ringgold, and Winfield Scott.

FILM 21:5 - Request access

Guides:

Library of Congress. Manuscript Division. Index to the Zachary Taylor papers

The guide provides an index of writers and recipients.

Tudway of Wells Antiguan Estate Papers, 1689-1907.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, England: Microform Academic Publishers, 1999
British records relating to America in microfilm
30 reel(s)

The records included in this collection cover over three centuries of the operation of an Antiguan sugar plantation, providing the most complete surviving private records pertaining to these plantations. The plantation, called Parham and located on the eastern part of the island of Antigua in what was the British Caribbean, was owned by the Tudway family of Wells Somerset and was in operation by 1689, contributing to the sugar boom experienced by the island in the 1680s. The Tudway family, a prosperous middle-class family, acted as absentee owners who rarely visited the plantation; thus, they did not witness the slave-labor source of their wealth. Records in these papers cover the years 1689 to 1920 and consist of a virtually complete set of annual accounts during those years, correspondence dating from 1717 to 1898 written from both Britain and Antigua, paylists, slave registers, and records of sugar cane experiments from 1905 to 1907. The records provide full details on all operating aspects of a sugar plantation as well as attitudes on absentee landlords and legislation affecting the sugar business and are valuable for reconstructing the social and economic history of the British Caribbean.

FILM BOOK 0324 - CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLE; REQUEST THROUGH INTERLIBRARY LOAN

Guides:

Morgan, Kenneth. The Tudway of Wells Antiguan estate papers, 1689-1907 : a brief introduction to the microfilm edition of the Tudway of Wells estate papers PDF

Also available under call number HD8244.4 .M67 1999.

United States. Adjutant General’s Office. Negro in the Military Service of the United States, 1639-1886.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1963 
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 823; v. National Archives record group 94.
5 reel(s)

Between 1885 and 1888 the United States Adjutant General's Office compiled federal documents relating to military service of blacks from miscellaneous sources such as secondary works, colonial records, and state legislative records. The largest portion of the material focuses on blacks during the Civil War. Fugitive slaves, black laborers, the Confederate use of blacks, the changing legal status of blacks, and black military service are covered. Blacks served in the Georgia, Louisiana, North and South Carolina militias before the Civil War. Often they were laborers, but sometimes they served as fighting men. They also served in the American Revolutionary Army and in other wars.

There is a description of the contents at the beginning of each reel.

FILM 9:6 - Request access