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Microform Collections A-Z

The microform collection is wide and varied in subject. These listings reflect popular research areas and will serve as a good starting point, however, the listings are not exhaustive. Please use the search box at the top of the page or click on "General"

Gale-Morant Papers, 1731-1925

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng: EP Microfilm Limited, 1977
British records relating to America
2 reel(s)

The Gale and Morant families went to Jamaica in the seventeenth century. Over several generations they acquired sugar plantations and slaves. The papers concern family and business affairs from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, with a concentration of materials for the period from 1765 to 1835. The papers shed light on slavery and the life and work on Jamaican sugar estates. A great deal of information is recorded on the lists of slaves, such as age, country of origin, occupation, physical condition, and value. Sex ratios, age distribution, and the number of births and deaths can be derived from using these records. Also included are letters concerning plantation livestock, shipments of sugar and rum, crop accounts, deeds, bonds, and wills.

Guides:

The Gale-Morant papers, 1731-1925 PDF

An uncataloged guide, The Gale-Morant Papers, is also available in the Special Collections Office.

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Gallatin, Albert 1761-1849. Papers of Albert Gallatin.

Philadelphia, Pa.: Historic publications, 1969
46 reel(s)

Albert Gallatin, an emigrant from Switzerland, served as secretary of the treasury in the administrations of Jefferson and Madison. In later years, Gallatin served as an American envoy to Russia and as Minister to France and England. He served as president of the National Bank of New York City, the New York Historical Society, and the American Ethnological Society. His reports and correspondence contain observations and policy proposals on public land, public finance, the government's debts, roads and canals, and manufactures. This collection also contains detailed information on the Anglo-American economy, the London money market, and the declining stability of the banking structure of New York City before the disaster of 1837. Correspondents include Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and John Quincy Adams. He also corresponded with Henry Clay, Henry Dearborn, Peter Muhlenburg, Thomas Worthington, Tench Coxe, John Jacob Astor, Baring & Co., and Azariah Flagg.

An uncataloged guide, Prince, Carl E. Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Papers of Albert Gallatin, available in the Special Collections Office, provides a brief sketch of his life with a chronology, a description of the collection, and reel notes. Reel 46 provides a name index to correspondents.

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Game Laws (6 Works).

1 reel(s)

This reel contains six separate books regarding English game laws by Timothy Cunningham, Edward H. Lord Suffield, Richard Griffiths Welford, Giles Jacob, John Locke, and John Manwood. See each individual name for details.

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Game Laws; Being a Comprehensive and Familiar Treatise Upon That Subject.

London: 1821
1 reel(s)

This anonymous work gives the origin, history, and principles of game laws; who is entitled to hunt and penalties for those who are not; buying and selling of game; improper hunting times; the role of the gamekeeper; laws relating to different game; etc.

Title continues “Comprising all the statutes and resolutions of the courts relating to deer, hares, rabbits, pheasants, partridges, grouse, snipe, fish, and other objects of sport; together with the qualifications, by estate and certificate, for killing game; the appointment and authority of a gamkeeper [sic]; the law concerning trespass in the pursuit of game; and the general law relating to dogs. A new edition, corrected and enlarged, including the new acts to 58 Geo. III. Respecting the buying and selling game; and also, the act for preventing the destroying salmon spawn in the rivers of England.” Table of contents at the beginning; index at the end.

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Garvey, Marcus 1887-1940. Marcus Garvey: FBI Investigation File.

Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1978 
1 reel(s)

During the decade of the 1920's, when most Americans experienced more prosperity than they ever had before, some poor blacks were desperately searching for a way in which they, too, could increase their standard of living. Marcus Garvey, a black American leader, born in Jamaica, took advantage of their situation. He started a "Back to Africa" movement that promised them a better life in a land where they no longer would be members of a minority race. Garvey also founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and had as many as 2 million followers. Many sent him money which he used to set up black businesses, profits of which were supposed to finance the movement. In 1925, however, Garvey was convicted of mail fraud in connection with the sale of worthless stock in one of the businesses, The Black Star Line, a supposed shipping company. "The Back to Africa" movement declined after Garvey was incarcerated.

Not accompanied by a guide. Includes New York Times articles, 1962-1971, archives from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Universal Negro Improvement Association.

FILM BOOK 0295

Gaston, William 1778-1844. William Gaston Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library.

Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Library, 1966
8 reel(s)

William Gaston (1778-1844) was a North Carolina lawyer, legislator, congressman, and justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. William Gaston's personal letters reveal the social history of the period and comment on political affairs. Topics include the national elections between 1800 and 1844, preparations for war with France in 1800, financial affairs, De Witt Clinton's presidential candidacy, education, and legal matters. Significant items concerning the history of the Catholic Church in America are scattered throughout as are items related to banks and banking. Included in the collection are Gaston-related papers of Judge Henry Groves Connor (1852-1924), North Carolina jurist and author.

An uncataloged guide, The William Gaston Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library, available in the Special Collections Office, provides a list of correspondents.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Gates, Horatio 1728-1806. Horatio Gates Papers, 1726-1828.

Sanford, N.C.: Microfilming Corporation of America, 1978
20 reel(s)

General Horatio Gates remains a paradox in American Revolutionary history. He was a loyal soldier, an excellent army administrator, and a good defensive tactician. In 1777 he superseded General Philip Schuyler in command in northern New York. In the two battles at Saratoga his army forced General John Burgoyne to surrender. Soon after, a letter written by General Thomas Conway caused General George Washington to believe that he had uncovered a conspiracy to make Gates commander-in-chief, a conspiracy known as the Conway Cabal. Forced to resign his position as president of the board of war and disastrously defeated at Camden, South Carolina, General Gates never regained the heroic reputation he enjoyed immediately after Saratoga. His papers provide a unique opportunity for the researcher to make his own judgements about a leading figure of the American Revolution. This collection is arranged in three series: Series I is correspondence from 1726 to 1828, Series II is orderly books and returns from 1756 to 1783, and Series III is financial papers from 1747 to 1799.

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Guides:

The Horatio Gates papers, 1726-1828 : a guide to the microfilm edition

The guide includes an index to documents by writer or recipient, providing reel and frame numbers.

General Council of the Congregational and Christian Churches of the United States. Minutes of the Regular Meeting, 1852-1961.

Dallas, TX: Microfilm Service and Sales, 1969 
Library of American Church Records. Series 1
4 reel(s)

This collection contains minutes of the meetings of synods of the Congregational Church. The synods were held in 1852, 1865, every third year from 1871 to 1934 and every second year from 1934 to 1958. The last synod included in the collection met in 1961. The minutes give the names of delegates participating and officers elected, the reports of the committees, and the statistics of the church. Also included are the resolutions and by-laws voted on by the synods. The last reel contains also two digests of important acts of the synods held between 1871 and 1929.

NOT IN MERLIN

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Germany (West). Bundestag. Verhandlungen. Stenographische Berichte, Bd 1-49, Sept 7, 1949-, Bonn.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1965
23 reel(s)

The papers of the Bundestag, the West German Parliament, date from its establishment in 1949. Registers of the proceedings are divided into subject registers and speech indexes. Each register covers one legislative period. The index encompasses all speeches made during a plenary session of Parliament, with the names of the speakers arranged in alphabetical order. A separate section provides the actual proceedings of each session. Speeches, interruptions, motions, discussions, and attendance are included.

The records are arranged chronologically. A table of contents is at the beginning of each year. Indexes for 1949-53 and 1953-57 are on reels 122 and 123 respectively.

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Germany. Auswartiges Amt. [Aktenzeichen] Russland 61: Allgemeine Angelegenheiten Russlands.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1953
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 139; v. National Archives record group 242
2 reel(s)

reels 147-148
Selected reels from the microfilmed records of the German Foreign Ministry Archives (1867-1920) relate to Russia and Rumania. Telegrams, letters, and reports describe Russian domestic and military affairs from March 20, to October 28, 1918. In the spring of 1918, Russia withdrew from World War I and began peace talks with Germany. On March 3, Russia and Germany signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. The Bolsheviks had gained control of the government, but during the summer, civil war continued between the Communists and the anti-Communists. Nicholas II and his family as well as Count von Mirbach, the German ambassador, were assassinated. The papers provide a German perspective on the events during that period. The National Archives title of this collection is Records of the German Foreign Office Received by the Department of State from the University of California (Project 1) and are part of their collection of Foreign Records Seized 1941-.

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Germany. Auswartiges Amt. Notes from the Legations of the German States and Germany in the United States to the Department of State, 1817-1906.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1962
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. M 58; v. National Archives record group 59.
35 reel(s)

Notes, with enclosures, consist chiefly of communications from the German Foreign Office, from German consuls, and from private citizens in the United States. They deal with the general relations between Prussia and the United States, wider diplomatic questions, and commercial and legal difficulties of private citizens. Topics include shipping, trade and tariffs, international conferences, specific criminal cases, and Germans who serving in the American military. The languages used are French, German, and English. Documents in German are accompanied by brief notes in English indicating their subject content.

An uncataloged guide, Notes From the Legations of the German States and Germany in the United States to the Department of State, 1817-1906, available in the Special Collections Office, indicates the date span for each reel. The first reel, from 1817 to 1848, covers notes from the Prussian legation. It has its own introduction, followed by a list of correspondence with subject notations.

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Germany. Auswartiges Amt. Papers of German Diplomats. (Nachlasse and Asservate), 1833-1927. (American Historical Association Project II).

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1958
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 291; v. National Archives record group 242.
3 reel(s)

Selected microfilm reels contain the papers of various German diplomats. On reel five, the Paul Weitz papers include correspondence related to his business interests in Constantinople (Istanbul). They also contain letters from the families of the Prince of Ratibor and Corvey and the Prince of Schonborg-Waldenburg. The Hans Rudolf Erick von Miguel papers contain essays about Paris, St. Petersburg (Leningrad), and Constantinople. On the sixth reel, the papers of Paul von Hintze an envoy to Peking who became a state-secretary in 1918, contain material from a committee of inquiry into the possibilities of peace in 1917. The papers also explore Papal peace efforts, peace with France and Italy, and private peace initiatives. On the seventh reel, papers originally belonging to Crown-Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, discuss politics from 1879 to 1881 and the assassination of Alexander II of Russia. Other papers on the final reel belonged to Sass, head of the library and political archives of the German Foreign Ministry, and Magnus, who wrote reports on Mexico in 1866 and 1877. The papers are part of the National Archives' collection of seized World War II enemy records.

3 selected microfilm reels (no. 5, 6, 7). Each section is preceded by a table of contents.

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Germany. Auswartiges Amt. Records of the German Foreign Office Received by the Department of State [Whaddon Hall, Eng.].

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service,
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 120; v. National Archives record group 242.
35 reel(s)

The German Documents Project at the National Archives selected and filmed seized German records that illustrated German foreign policy, while the records were temporarily housed at Whaddon Hall in England. These assorted files of the German Foreign Ministry (or Office) from 1855 to 1945 discuss military affairs, foreign relations, and events leading up to World War II. The principal documents were later translated and printed in a series titled Documents on German Foreign Policy, 1918-1945 (353.8 S1.82). While the documents on the microfilm are arranged by subject according to the original classification of the German Foreign Ministry, the principal documents in the printed series are arranged chronologically.

35 selected microfilm reels. Reel 1A reproduces various indexing documents for sections of the collection. Also, CD1261.A65 Kent, George O. (ed.). A Catalog of Files and Microfilm of the German Foreign Ministry Archives 1920-1945 provides subject access to the entire collection of 5,055 reels, but does not provide a listing of contents of individual reels. Ellis Library's holdings currently are reels no. 1A, 1012, 1567-1574, 3154, 3429-3446, 3534-3537, 4177, and 4340-4341.

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Germany. Auswartiges Amt. Records of the German Foreign Office Received by the Department of State from St. Antony’s College.

Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service,
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 136; v. National Archives record group 242.
6 reel(s)

The German Foreign Ministry was responsible for the relations between Germany and foreign countries as well as between the German states. The files in this collection provide information on foreign relations between September 1912, and September 1919. The files consist mainly of correspondence between embassies and the government in Berlin. They include newspaper articles, telegrams, and notes from ambassadors, key figures, and private citizens involved in political events. The files on foreign countries focus on the relationship of Germany to Russia, Italy, Rumania, Austria, and the Ukraine, general and marine affairs in Russia, Russian statesmen, and the administration of occupied territories in Serbia during the war. The following is a brief summary of reel contents: Reel 33, Deutschland 131 secr, Oesterreich 92, Ministerien, Italien; Reel 83, Deutschland 131, Weltkrieg Nr 14d; Reel 85, Rumanien 1; Reel 101, Ukraine; Reel 130, Russland 72b; and Reel 131, Russland 82 Nr2. The papers are part of the National Archives collection of seized World War II enemy records.

6 selected microfilm reels (no. 33, 83, 85, 101, 130, 131).

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Guides:

American Historical Association. Committee for the Study of War Documents. A catalogue of files and microfilms of the German Foreign Ministry archives, 1867-1920.

The guide provides an organizational framework for the existing files. The inclusive dates of files, together with the reel and frame number of the microfilm project which filmed the file, make this a useful, although not complete, finding aid. Reels filmed by the St. Antony project have the prefix SA.

Germany. Heer. Records of German Army Areas (Wehrkreise).

Washington, D.C: American Historical Association,
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 79; v. National Archives record group 242
8 reel(s)

The records cover Wehrkreis VII, Munchen, to which Swabia, Upper Bavaria, and Lower Bavaria belonged, from 1909 to the early 1940s. Papers, circulars, orders, reports, and correspondence give instructions on such areas as personnel policy and the defense of army installations. Corps, divisional, and regimental orders relate to the infiltration of Austria, Czechoslovakia, and the Tyrol and provide relevant maps, war diaries, and statistics. Reel 53 contains newspaper clippings related to the charge of perjury brought against Oberleutnant Braun by Hauptmann A. D. Rohm. Reels 81 and 82 deal with such subjects as the air raids in Hamburg, the surrender of troops, and the effects of World War II on housing. The records are part of the National Archives' collection of seized World War II enemy records.

8 selected microfilm reels (no. 9, 33, 48, 49, 52, 53, 81, 82).
Vol. 34 of the guide provides notes on the contents of each reel in this collection.

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Guides:

Guides to German records microfilmed at Alexandria, Va.

The guide provides a detailed list of contents for each reel.

Germany. Reichsfuhrer SS und Chef der Deutschen Polizei. Records of the Reich Leader of the SS and Chief of the German Police.

Washington, D.C.: American Historical Association., 158
National Archives microfilm publications. Microcopy no. T 175; v. National Archives record group 242.
105 reel(s)

This collection reproduces the files of the RF-SS/Personlicher Stab, the RF-SS/Feldkommandostelle, and various other police and security agencies under the command of the Reich leader of the SS. Documents cover political plans and policies, diplomacy, military affairs, armament, manpower, ideology, genocide, and astrology, all matters of concern to Heinrich Himmler. The range of subjects reflect the variety of his activities. Specific subjects include anti-semitism, the use of prisoners for slave labor, German intelligence work, Nazi movements in other countries, and concentration camps. The records are part of National Archives' collection of seized World War II enemy records.

105 selected microfilm reels.

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Guides:

Guides to German records microfilmed at Alexandria, Va.

The guide provides a detailed list of contents for each reel.

Gossypium (Ship). James Brown Papers in the Liverpool Central Library.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform, 1973
British records relating to America
1 reel(s)

Captain James Brown kept a private log-book when he commanded the Liverpool trading ship, Gossypium, on a total of eleven voyages from Liverpool to New Orleans between 1844 and 1846. The voyages occurred during a period of rapid expansion in cotton growing in the southern states and in the textile trade in Lancashire. The log-book notes weather and sailing conditions and shipboard activities. The collection also contains a letter book and a collection of accounts connected with the voyages of the Gossypium and other ships in which Brown had a financial interest. These accounts register expenses for provisions and supplies, harbor dues, and other such items.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears at the beginning of the reel.

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Guides:

The papers of James Brown, 1843-1851 PDF

Grant, Ulysses Simpson, 1822-1885. Ulysses S. Grant Papers.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1964
Presidential papers microfilm
32 reel(s)

Ulysses S. Grant, General-in-Chief of all the federal armies in the Civil War, won the Republican presidential nomination in 1868. He defeated Horatio Seymour to become the eighteenth president of the United States, serving from 1869 to 1877. These papers contain general correspondence, including Grant's letters to Julia B. Dent (later Mrs. Grant). Also included are copies of Grant documents from other collections, such as letterbooks, speeches, reports, messages, and personal memoirs, like "Memoirs of Shiloh". Headquarters records (1861-69) and other military records comprise a substantial part of the collection. Photographs, clippings, drawings, and scrapbooks are also included. Correspondents include W.W. Belknap, A.E. Burnside, B.F. Butler, G.M. Dodge, H. Fish, J.C. Fremont, J.D. Grant, H.W. Halleck, C.S. Hamilton, W.S. Hancock, R.B. Hatch, S.A. Hurlbut, J.C. Kelton, J.A. McClernand, J.B. McPherson, G.G. Meade, E.O.C. Ord, J. Pope, J.M. Schofield, P.H. Sheridan, W.T. Sherman, E.M. Stanton, G.H. Thomas, and L. Thomas.

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Guides:

Library of Congress. Manuscript Division. Index to the Ulysses S. Grant papers

The guide includes an index of writers and recipients.

Great Britain. Admiralty. Mediterranean Passes [in the Public Record Office, London] 1662-1784.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform, 1981
British records relating to America
11 reel(s)

For almost two centuries beginning in 1662, passes to free navigation of the Mediterranean were provided for English ships by the Admiralty. Treaties with rulers of the Barbary states gave British ships protection against attacks from corsairs and privateers along the coast of North Africa. This collection contains both registers and indexes of the passes. The registers date from 1662 to 1784. From 1662 to 1668 about 140 passes were issued per year. This rose to over 1,200 per year by the 1730s. The increase may reflect the requirement of compulsory passes in the 1682 treaty with Algiers and the rapid expansion of British trade over routes vulnerable to corsair activity. Information given in the registers includes the name of the ship, date of the pass, the master’s name, the place of construction, the home port, the tonnage, and the number of guns and crew. From 1730 on, the intended destination is given. The registers offer a fairly accurate index of British shipping engaged in the African and East India trade after 1730.

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Guides:

Richardson, David. The Mediterranean passes in the Public Records Office, London PDF

The guide provides background and the date span of each reel. Also available under the call number VA456 .R5.

Great Britain. Colonial Office. America and West Indies; Original Correspondence (Various): C.O. 5.

London: Public Record Office,
56 reel(s)

This collection is the largest and most important Colonial Office group on American colonial history. It consists of the original correspondence and entry books of the old Board of Trade and Plantations and the secretary of state. The Board of Trade and Plantations managed the early economic development of the American colonies until its abolition in 1782. The military and political government was under the control of the secretary of state. The papers include miscellaneous letters from authorities in England to military personnel and secretaries of state in the colonies, letters exchanged between governors, and petitions from colonists. Topics covered in Ellis' holdings include a narrative of the Boston Tea Party, peace negotiations, Indian affairs, the Canadian, Carthagena, and Louisburg expeditions, expenses of colonial establishments, correspondence of Lieutenant General John Burgoyne and Major General William Heath concerning American troops captured at Saratoga, patents and grants of land in North Carolina (1707-1775), and letters of governors, the Board of Trade, and the secretary of state, Lord Shelburne, relating to West Florida.

Ellis Library has vol. 7-9, 41, 42 (incomplete), 43-45. Vol. 36 of List and Indexes provides a general index to the collection.

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Guides:

Andrews, Charles McLean, 1863-1943. Guide to the materials for American history, to 1783, in the Public record office of Great Britain

The guide provides the historical background of the collection and a partial (but useful) list of contents.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Lists and indexes.

Great Britain. Colonial Office. Barbadoes. Original Correspondence. 1689/1752: (C.O. 28; C.O. 537).

London: Public Record Office, 1969
30 reel(s)

Barbados (formerly known as Barbadoes) was first settled in 1627 by the British. As a British colony, Barbados traded (not always legitimately) with New England, New York, and Virginia throughout the colonial period, exchanging sugar, cotton, molasses, and ginger for foodstuffs. Many settlers migrated from Barbados to the Carolinas. This collection contains original correspondence with the Board of Trade and the secretary of state. Letters from the governors, including James Kendall, James Cunninghame, Edwin Stede, and Henry Grenville, relate to petitions, memorials, and proceedings in chancery and admiralty courts. Topics include the security of Barbados and regulation of goods (mainly sugar) exported to Europe.

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Cameroons Under United Kingdom Administration 1920/21-1938.

New York: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1972
2 reel(s)

In 1922 the League of Nations awarded mandates to the French and British over the German protectorate of Cameroon. The British were given jurisdiction over the western section of the territory. Beginning in 1922 the lieutenant-governors of Nigeria, as administrators of the areas within the British sphere, prepared reports for submission to Parliament, and, in later years, for submission to the League of Nations. Reports discuss the status of the territory, international relations, administration, public finance, taxation, trade statistics, legal questions, police, prisons, defense, arms, education, slavery, labor, religion, public health, land tenure, forestry, agriculture, mines, population statistics, public works, and marine affairs.

The title varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. Paper copies for 1922 to 1923 and 1925 to 1938 are in Annex I (J805.N15).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Report of His Britannic Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Council of the League of Nations on the Administration of Iraq.

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1973
1 reel(s)

In 1920 the League of Nations granted Great Britain a mandate over Iraq. The mandate ended in 1932. During this period, the Colonial Office issued reports on its administrative actions. Subjects include political developments within the country, foreign relations, jails, health services, agriculture, foreign trade, budgets, civil and criminal courts, legislation, military training, public works, and education. Appendices include the texts of specific legislation.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each report. The microfilm covers reports from 1920 to 1932. Paper copies for the same time period are available (956.7 G79).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Report of His Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the General Assembly of the United Nations on the Administration of Togoland Under United Kingdom Trusteeship. 1920/21-.

London: Library of Congress for Andronicus, 1972
2 reel(s)

The early reports on the British trusteeship of Togoland were issued by the governor of the Gold Coast. In 1919 Great Britain gained control of the eastern section of the former German protectorate of Togo (now part of Ghana and the Republic of Togo). In 1922 the League of Nations confirmed a mandate for Great Britain over British Togoland. British Togoland eventually joined with the Gold Coast to form the independent nation of Ghana. The British Colonial Office reports cover administrative concerns, such as international relations, finance, taxation, trade statistics, the court system, police, prisons, defense, arms, social conditions, labor, religion, education, public health, land tenure, forestry, agriculture, and mines.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. The microfilm collection covers reports for 1920 to 1938. Paper editions for 1920 to 1936 are available in Annex I (J809.N15).

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Great Britain. Colonial Office. Tanganyika Under United Kingdom Administration: Report by Her Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the General Assembly of the United Nations. 1920-.

Washington, D.C.: he Library of Congress for Adronicus, 1970
2 reel(s)

After defeating the German Army in 1916 at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro, the British Army occupied German East Africa. In 1919, Britain obtained a protectorate over the conquered territory, renamed Tanganyika (Tanzania), from the League of Nations. Beginning in 1921, colonial administrators began sending annual reports to the British Colonial Office concerning conditions in the territory. The initial report contains extensive background information, including geography, local history of the period to 1921, the ethnography of local tribes, current information on administration, population, finance, trade, agriculture, industries, land tenure, police, prisons, health, and government services. Subsequent reports update this information annually through 1938. In 1946 the reports resumed and continued until 1963. Of these later reports, Ellis has the paper copy only for 1959.

The title of the report varies. A table of contents appears at the beginning of each annual report. The film covers the period from 1920 to 1938. Paper copies for dates 1920 to 1938 and 1959 are available in Annex I (J801.N15).

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Great Britain. Commissioner of Customs in America. Customs 16 America, 1768-1772, in the Public Record Office, London.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: Micro Methods, 1967
British records relating to America
1 reel(s)

Statistics in this volume were compiled from official records of the American Board of Customs in Boston, instituted in 1767. The statistics document the commodity trade and the movement of shipping in the various ports of the United States from 1768 to 1772. The imperial customs authorities drew up detailed tables of imports, exports, coastwise trade, and taxable commodities. The tables give the number of vessels, their rig and total tonnage, and ports of call. Customs 16 is an archival class mark give to this collection by the Public Records Office.

A description of the collection and its arrangement appears on the reel.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Custom-house, Liverpool. Liverpool Plantation Registers, 1744-1773 and 1779-1784.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: E.P. Microfilm, Limited, 1979
British records relating to America
2 reel(s)

By the Navigation Act of 1696, the British Parliament required that any shipping involved in the colonial trade must be restricted to British, Irish, or colonial vessels. To operate under this law, all vessels intending to trade with the colonies had to register at one of the customs houses in a British port. This collection contains those registries from the Liverpool Customs House. Each register includes the ship’s name, port of origin, master’s name, kind or build of the ship, its cargo, the location where it was built and the year, and the owner’s name. After the guide in the first reel, a set of ten indexes gives valuable quantitative and locational information from the registers.

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Guides:

The Liverpool Plantation Registers, 1744-1773 and 1779-1784 PDF

Also available under call number HE565.G7 A7.

Great Britain. Foreign Office. Correspondence Respecting China, 1848-1922. F.O. 405, 1-239.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
33 reel(s)

By 1848, when this collection of official correspondence begins, Britain had established a sphere of influence in China at Canton. She continued to extend that sphere in the face of competition from other European nations and Japan. Britain also faced considerable hostility from Chinese nationalists. This hostility resulted in the "Arrow" War, the Taiping Rebellion, and the Boxer Rebellion. By 1922, the nationalist Kuomintang party under Sun Yat-sen had overthrown the Manchu dynasty, established the Republic of China, and faced rebellions from local warlords and the Chinese Communists under Mao Tse-tung. The correspondence differs in focus, from specific incidents, such as an attack on British subjects, or specific subjects, such as railways in China, to general correspondence for a stated period.

The correspondence is grouped by subject. A list of correspondence appears at the beginning of each group.
NOT IN MERLIN

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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Correspondence Respecting Japan 1859-1922. F.O. 410, 1-73.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
9 reel(s)

Correspondence to and from British ministers to Japan dates from the relaxation of Japan's isolation policy through World War I. As the Japanese expanded their territorial influence, Great Britain and Japan forged a strong Anglo-Japanese alliance. England supported Japan in its bid against Russia for Korea and Manchuria. As an ally, Japan declared war on Germany in 1914, seizing German islands in the Pacific region. The relationship cooled after World War I as Great Britain and the United States formed a new coalition and Japan was not allowed to annex the seized German colonies. The correspondence deals with the establishment of a British consulate in Japan, the progress of trade agreements, commercial treaties, tariffs, the protection of British subjects, the relationship of Japan with other nations, and other diplomatic concerns.

The letters are arranged in chronological order. A list of correspondence at the beginning of each volume indicates the subject content.
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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Further Correspondence Respecting Southeast Asia, 1883-1922. F.O. 422.

London: Public Record Office, 
7 reel(s)

Letters of the Foreign, Colonial, and India Offices and their ministers relate to British interests in Southeast Asia. Correspondence, beginning in 1883, documents the establishment of a French protectorate over Annam and Tonquin, later known as Indochina and as Vietnam. Other correspondence reports on the affairs of Burma and Siam (Thailand). In 1893, France took over Laos east of the Mekong, leading to fears of a French attack on Bangkok. The British favored the maintenance of a buffer state between French holdings and British possessions such as Burma and others. In final negotiations, both Great Britain and France guaranteed the independence of Siam. The letters discuss various treaty negotiations, the protection of British-registered companies and British subjects, trade, the construction of railways, and conferences concerning the demarcation of the frontiers of Burma and Siam.

A list of correspondence with subject notes precedes each volume. The general arrangement is chronological with some subject grouping by region.
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Great Britain. Foreign Office. Further Correspondence Respecting the Affairs of North America, 1912-1921. F.O. 414.

London: Public Record Office, 1967 
3 reel(s)

The official correspondence in this collection from 1913 through 1915 focuses primarily on the situation in revolutionary Mexico. Correspondents discuss the mounting tension between the United States and the Huerta regime and examine the security of British citizens and property in Mexico. They also communicate the current political situation in the United States, concerns about the Panama Canal, and demands for rights in the seal fisheries off the Pribiloff Islands. After 1916, the correspondence includes such topics as the Pan-American Conference, the debate over the League of Nations in the United States Congress, post-World War I territorial adjustments, and especially the Washington Conference of 1921.

A table of contents appears at the beginning of each group of letters. Ellis Library has numbers 235-248.
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Great Britain. India Office Record Selections.

London: Kodak, Ltd, 1964 
5 reel(s)

These records contain letters, charts, bills, proceedings, and reports regarding India in the early 1900s. Reel 1 contains proceedings of the Home Department, January 1902-December 1907. Reel 2 contains proceedings of the Home Department, January 1908-October 1909, and proceedings of the Department of Revenue and Agriculture, January 1907, and July-September 1909. Reel 3 contains Home Department reports regarding the plague from 1904-1907, proceedings from the Department of Revenue and Agriculture from 1902 and 1904, agriculture bills, and 1903 maps showing positions of the Chenab Nahri Circle in different areas of India. Reel 4 contains proceedings from the Department of Revenue and Agriculture from 1905-1908 and 1910, and confidential letters to the Governor General of India in Council. Reel 5 contains confidential letters, newspapers articles, and criminal reports regarding East Indians in British Columbia, a paper on the Hindu-Muhammadan riots from 1889-1893, and Home Department letters.

Note: Selected by N.G. Barrier in the summer of 1964.
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Great Britain. India Office. Library. Miscellaneous Publications from the India Office Library and the India Office Records, 1897-1919.

London: Kodak, Limited, 1968 
2 reel(s)

The period of 1897 to 1919 saw an increasing nationalist agitation in British India. The Indian National Congress pressured Lord Curzon's colonial administration to grant Indians greater participation in the government. With their large contribution of men to the British army in World War I, Indian leaders expected additional reforms but were sorely disappointed. This disappointment made them receptive to Gandhi's non-cooperative movement. India's internal problems were compounded by conflict among Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs. The titles of the materials in this collection are: Report of the 10th National Social Conference (1897), Report of the 13th National Social Conference (1899), Lahore Guide and Directory (1917), Islam and Ahmadism and Notes on Hindus and Sikhs (1895), Politico-Criminal Who's Who (1914), Political Trouble in India (1907-1917), and An Account of the Ghadi Conspiracy (1919).

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Great Britain. India Office. Library. Selected Documents of the India Office Library and India Office Records on the Punjab, 1850-1871.

London: Kodak Ltd., Recordak Ricrofilm Services, 1967 
7 reel(s)

This collection contains the Lahore Chronicle 1850-1868, Papers of the Agri-Horticultural Society of the Punjab, tracts of the Punjab Tenancy Act and land reserve discussion, Punjab civil lists 1872, 1878, the history of the Punjab Services 1883-1887, the north west province unconvenanted servants 1846-52 and 1854-62, the annual report of the police administration in the Punjab 1861-1871, and documents relating to the railways in India.

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Great Britain. India Office. Library. Tracts and Miscellaneous Printed Materials on the Punjab.

London: Recordak Microfilm Service, 1967 
9 reel(s)

The tracts filmed were written in the period from 1837 to 1931. They cover such subjects as agricultural resources, the prayer book of the Aryans, the state of Indian politics, the terminology of the Vedas, the grant of titles and honorary distinctions in India, the principles and teachings of the Arya Samaj, and Lala Kashi Ram and his theistic propaganda. Other titles discuss the All India Moslem League of 1918, Sikh ceremonies, ideals of non-cooperation, reports of the Public Service Commission for 1887, British rule in India, the Maharaja of Cashmere, the caste system, Sikh education, self-government in India, and the doctrine of re-incarnation.

A list of titles filmed is available in the Special Collections Office.
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Great Britain. Indian Disorders Committee 1920. Reports, Proceedings and Memoranda of the Cabinet Committee on Indian Disorders Cab 27/91-93.

London: Public Record Office, 
2 reel(s)

The Disorders Inquiry Committee investigated the civil disturbances in Bombay, Delhi, and the Punjab following the passage of the Rolwatt Acts. The committee attempted to determine the causes and evaluate the measures taken to cope with the disturbances. In particular, the committee heard testimony on the events leading up to the massacre at Amritsar, the arrest of Gandhi, and the riots in Ahmedabad. The first reel also contains the minutes of meetings of the British Empire Delegation to the Paris Peace Conference, January to June 1919 (CAB 29/28). The second reel contains reports, proceedings, and memoranda of the War Cabinet Committee on the proposed exchange of Gibraltar for Ceuta, April 1917 to February 1919 (CAB 27/51).

Record groups filmed also include CAB 29/28 and CAB 27/51.
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Great Britain. Inquiry into the Characters of Parties in the British Government.

London: Microfilmed by the Newberry Library, Chicago, 1782 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet discusses the Monarchical and Republican parties and events which have influenced them: “the Roman and Saxon establishments in Britain;” “the Norman establishment of the events which gradually formed the English Government;” “the reigns of the Stuarts;” and “the reigns since the Revolution to the present period.” It also discusses Tories and Whigs and their various characteristics.

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Great Britain. Inquiry into the Origin and Consequences of the Influence of the Crown Over Parliament.

London: 1780 
1 reel(s)

This pamphlet was written to call attention to the topics of: “shortening the duration of parliaments,” “increasing the number of representatives,” and “altering the nature of representation in order to destroy the influence of the crown over parliament.” It also discusses Britain’s failure in the American Revolution and states that “the influence of the crown [upon members of parliament] is too great for the safety of the constitution, and ought to be diminished.”

Title continues “Submitted to the Consideration of the Electors of Great Britain.” Dedicated to the “Right and Honourable The Earl Temple, A Young Nobleman.”
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Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. British Sessional Papers, 1731-1900 {London, H.M.S.O.}.

New York: Readex Microprint, 1964

The House of Commons bills, the House of Commons papers, and the Command papers (1731-1900) are sorted into four classes: 1) public bills, 2) reports from committees of the House of Commons, 3) reports from commissioners, inspectors and others (reports of Royal Commissioners, standing and ad hoc advisory committees, and various annual reports), and 4) accounts and papers (financial and statistical returns and treaty papers). Within each class the documents are arranged under alphabetical subject headings. Subjects reflect the variety of concerns of the British government, such as taxes, the relief of debtors, elections, government reform, the slave trade and the abolition of slavery, military affairs, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, improvements in transportation and communication, and the opening of Africa and the Far East. The collection consists of 80,000 documents totaling nearly 5,000,000 pages. It was originally published during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in more than 6,000 volumes. The last volume of each session contains a subject index and a numerical listing of bills, reports, accounts and papers, and command papers. The library has paper copies of sessional papers for the years between microform holdings.

MICPT 328.42

Guides:

British Sessional Papers: Collection of Indexes

The guide is shelved after the British Sessional Papers collection. It contains assorted indexes covering the period 1696 to 1900.

Irish University Press. Checklist of British parliamentary papers in the Irish University Press 1000-volume series, 1801-1899. –

This guide lists papers in chronological order for the stated period and also provides access by broad or specific subjects.

Lees-Smith, Hastings Bertrand, 1878-1941. A guide to parliamentary and official papers, by H. B. Lees-Smith.

This guide gives background information about the organization of the papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. List of House of Commons sessional papers, 1701-1750; edited by Sheila Lambert.

The guide is arranged chronologically with the papers for each session divided into the following categories: bills, reports of commissioners, reports of committees, accounts and papers, and command papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. House of Commons Sessional Papers, 1731-1900 {London, H.M.S.O}.

New York: Readex Microprint, 1964

The House of Commons bills, the House of Commons papers, and the Command papers (1731-1900) are sorted into four classes: 1) public bills, 2) reports from committees of the House of Commons, 3) reports from commissioners, inspectors and others (reports of Royal Commissioners, standing and ad hoc advisory committees, and various annual reports), and 4) accounts and papers (financial and statistical returns and treaty papers). Within each class the documents are arranged under alphabetical subject headings. Subjects reflect the variety of concerns of the British government, such as taxes, the relief of debtors, elections, government reform, the slave trade and the abolition of slavery, military affairs, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, improvements in transportation and communication, and the opening of Africa and the Far East. The collection consists of 80,000 documents totalling nearly 5,000,000 pages. It was originally published during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in more than 6,000 volumes. The last volume of each session contains a subject index and a numerical listing of bills, reports, accounts and papers, and command papers. The library has paper copies of sessional papers for the years between microform holdings.

MICPT 328.42.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons Official Report.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1987

The Parliamentary Debates are the official records of things said in Parliament. Since 1909, they are mostly verbatim, and written in the first person style. The Debates are published daily and weekly. Debates on a Bill are issued together and are subsequently published in bound volumes. There is an index for each volume and a general index for the whole year. A government minister in the department responsible for the measure normally proposes a Bill. Main principles are outlined and important clauses summarized. The official Opposition spokesman responds and the views of other Opposition parties and backbenchers are heard. The debate normally concludes with a response from another government minister who deals with major points raised during the debates.

MICF 4826

Guides:

Ford, P. (Percy), 1894- A guide to parliamentary papers; what they are, how to find them, how to use them

The guide traces the development and organization of the parliamentary papers. It explains how standards were set for the compilation, scope, grammatical style, and cost of production of the debates.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. Parliamentary Papers. Bills {London: H.M.S.O.}.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1980

The House of Commons bills, the House of Commons papers, and the Command papers cover the period from 1979 to 1980 to date for each session of Parliament. They contain reports, correspondence, bills, accounts, statistics, and other materials Parliament ordered to be printed. Header strips on each microfiche identify the collection as a bill, a House of Commons paper, or a Command paper and give the collection title, the session date, and the pagination if an item extends beyond one fiche. The library has paper copies of sessional papers for years between microform holdings

Guide: [microfiche] House of Commons. Sessional Papers. Monthly Index. 1985-. This index is located in the Special Collections Office.

MICF 328.42

Guides:

Great Britain. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. Government publications issued during …

Lees-Smith, Hastings Bertrand, 1878-1941. A guide to parliamentary and official papers, by H. B. Lees-Smith.

This guide gives background information about the organization of the papers.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Lords Official Report.

Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. PARLIAMENTARY DEBATES (HANSARD). HOUSE OF LORDS OFFICIAL REPORT.

Cambridge, England: Chadwyck-Healey, 1987

The Parliamentary Debates are the official records of things said in Parliament. Since 1909, they are mostly verbatim, and written in the first person style. The Debates are published daily and weekly. Debates on a Bill are issued together and are subsequently published in bound volumes. There is an index for each volume and a general index for the whole year. The House of Lords papers take the same form as those of the Commons. The content is different in that the House of Lords do not represent constituencies nor are they involved in matters of taxation and finance. But they do debate other major issues of current interest. A government minister in the department responsible for the measure normally proposes a Bill. Main principles are outlined and important clauses summarized. The official Opposition spokesman responds and the views of other Opposition parties and backbenchers are heard. The debate normally concludes with a response from another government minister who deals with major points raised during the debates. The House of Lords rarely debates in smaller committees as does the House of Commons. Their debates normally take place in the "committee as a whole".

MICF 4827

Guides:

Ford, P. (Percy), 1894- A guide to parliamentary papers; what they are, how to find them, how to use them

The guide traces the development and organization of the parliamentary papers. It explains how standards were set for the compilation, scope, grammatical style, and cost of production of the debates.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet Letters in the Royal Archives, 1868-1916. Cab. 41.

London: Public Record Office, 1966
12 reel(s)

Until the formation of the Cabinet Secretariat in December 1916, no minutes were kept of the proceedings of British cabinet meetings. The only record of cabinet decisions was contained in the letters written by prime ministers to the sovereign after each meeting. These letters, which vary from brief statements of subjects discussed to more detailed accounts of arguments made and decisions reached, are preserved in the Royal Archive at Windsor Castle. This microfilm collection contains copies of almost 1,700 of these letters written between 1868 and 1916. Disraeli, Gladstone, Salisbury, Campbell-Bannerman and Asquith were the Prime Ministers.

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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet letters at Windsor, 1868-1916.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Cabinet Papers, 1880-1916, 1918-1923. Cab. 37, 26, 27.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
54 reel(s)

Cabinet ministers arranged for a printed memorandum to be circulated to their colleagues when they wanted to provide them with information or to secure their approval for a proposal. After the formation of the Cabinet Secretariat in December 1916, complete sets of papers were filmed and preserved. Before 1916 the papers that survived were scattered in a number of official and private collections; these papers have also been filmed and included in this collection. Topics covered include foreign relations, colonial affairs, taxation, and internal affairs.

FILM 11:1-2; 16:1 - Request access

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of Cabinet papers, 1880-1914.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Letters of Marque for the American War of Independence from the Public Record Office, London.

East Ardsley, Yorkshire, Eng.: EP Microform Limited, 1980
British records relating to America
4 reel(s)

As in previous wars, the British Crown issued letters of marque allowing private individuals to seize American shipping during the War for Independence. The letters provide details about the vessel, its place of ownership, tonnage, type and armament, master, owner and crew, and the period for which it was under the letter of marque. At the beginning of the first reel, the legislation creating letters of marque is reprinted which contains all of the regulations and restrictions that accompanied their use.

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Guides:

Minchinton, Walter E. Letters of marque, declarations against America 1777-1783 : in the Public Record Office, LondonPDF

The guide contains the provenance of the letters, background information on letters of marque, the use of letters of marque during the American War for Independence, a list of reel contents, and a bibliography of related works.

Also available under call number  HF3505.4 .M483 1980.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Memoranda: 1915 to 1922. Cab. 24.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
31 reel(s)

Papers prepared by ministers and officials that were printed and circulated to the British Cabinet from 1915 to 1922 are included. Their purpose was to initiate discussion of new policies, to state arguments for and against proposals made by ministers or departments, or simply to provide background information on topics to be discussed by the Cabinet. Although matters discussed at Cabinet meetings were frequently raised verbally by a minister, the most common method of bringing any subject to the attention of the Cabinet was by circulation of printed or typewritten memoranda in advance of a meeting. Among matters discussed were expenditures, activities of the League of Nations, foreign relations, postwar planning, and colonial matters. Included are memoranda circulated to the War Cabinet (December 1916 – October 1919).

(List and index society series. V. 29, 41, 52, 156). These indexes provide subject access to the collection.
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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List & Index Society Series

Great Britain. Public Record Office. The records of the Cabinet Office to 1922.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Minutes and Conclusions of the War Cabinet and Cabinet. Cab. 23/1-47, 61-67, 81-88.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
16 reel(s)

Minutes and conclusions of the War Cabinet, formed on December 9, 1916, span the period from 1916 to 1937. Subjects discussed are naval, military, domestic, and diplomatic matters such as news from the battle fronts, troop movements, disposition of guns and munitions, man-power planning, agreements with other countries, and peace proposals. Later meetings discuss reparations, treaties, shipping, continuing problems in Ireland, and foreign relations. The papers provide an unambiguous statement of each decision reached, a general synopsis of the expert evidence upon which conclusions were based, and a general summary of the arguments for and against the decisions made.

(List and index society series. V. 40, 51, 61, 62, 92, 100). These guides provide subject access. An index on reels 14-16 also provides subject access.

FILM 10:14 - Request access

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List & Index Society Series

Great Britain. Public Record Office. The records of the Cabinet Office to 1922

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Papers of the Committee of Imperial Defense, 1888-1914: Cab 38, 1-28.

London: Public Record Office, 1967 
9 reel(s)

In 1902 the Defense Committee of the Cabinet, formed in 1895, reorganized to include not only Cabinet ministers, but also heads of the Army and Navy. In 1904, the Prime Minister took the responsibility of the chairmanship, with absolute discretion in the selection of other members. The committee considered questions of defense against invasion both at home, and in particular, overseas territories. Memoranda concern subjects such as the Russian threat to India in Afghanistan and Persia (Iran), Egyptian defense, the Suez Canal, the Far East, national insurance of war risks, mine defenses, censorship, Russian navy movements, possible military action against Germany, and use of wireless telegraphy.

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Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of papers of the Committee of Imperial Defence to 1914 [by A. W. Mabbs]

The guide provides a chronological list of documents as they appear on the film. Subject content notes are provided.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Papers of the War Council, Dardanelles Committee and War Committee, 1914-1916: Cab 42, 1-26.

London: Public Record Office, 1967
8 reel(s)

In November 1914, the Cabinet of Great Britain appointed a War Council to consider general matters of war policy. The War Council existed only six months. In May 1915, the Coalition government created the Dardanelles Committee to review operations in the Dardanelles and Gallipoli. Replacing the War Council, it extended its deliberations to more general strategic and operational problems. On November 3, 1915, the War Committee superseded the Dardanelles Committee. For the thirteen months of its existence, committee's agenda covered the whole range of naval and military operations and the more general aspects of war policy. By the later part of 1916, it had assumed a considerable measure of executive authority in the day-to-day conduct of the war. It dealt with complicated problems of production, manpower, food supply, shipping, and other matters affecting the war effort, as well as diplomatic relations with allies and neutral countries.

FILM

Guides:

Great Britain. Public Record Office. List of Cabinet papers, 1880-1914.

Great Britain. Public Record Office. Records Relating to American Prisoners of War, 1812-1815.

East Ardsley, England: EP Microfilm Limited, 1981
British Records Relating to America
11 reel(s)

The records relating to Americans taken prisoner by British forces during the War of 1812 form a portion of the Admiralty records in the Public Records Office. The largest group of material is Medical Department: Registers. This consists of ledgers of information on American prisoners-of-war for prison ships and depots. The records were generated in the process of receiving and housing prisoners and monitoring their passage through the prison system. The ledgers recorded prisoners by number, name, place of birth, age, and physical attributes. They also recorded how the prisoners were taken, time and place of capture, ship from which prisoners were taken, supplies issued, and disposition of the prisoners. American prisoners were detained in England (8 locations), Canada (3 locations), Bermuda, New Providence, Barbadoes, Jamaica, Gibraltar, Malta, and Cape of Good Hope.

FILM 22:7 - Request access

Guides:

Dye, Ira. Records relating to American prisoners of war 1812-1815 : in the Public Record Office, London PDF

 Available in print under call number E354 .D8. The guide is also reproduced on reel one.

Green, Duff 1791 -1875. Duff Green Papers in the Southern Historical Collection of the University of North Carolina Library.

Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina, 1967
25 reel(s)

Duff Green was a journalist, politician, and industrial promoter. His papers include letters, business papers, clippings, maps, and thirty-four manuscript volumes. The letters (1810-1902) largely concern his business activities. Many were written to Benjamin Edwards Green, Duff Green's eldest son and business partner. The undated papers have been classified by business categories. Topics include the solicitation of subscriptions to Green's publications, the purchase and sale of land, especially Allegheny coal lands, the financing of companies, the construction of railroads, law cases, and claims against the government. The manuscript volumes contain letters, notebooks, correspondence records, account books, survey data, and records of the various companies owned by Green.

An uncataloged guide, Guide to the Microfilm Edition of the Duff Green Papers, is available in the Special Collections Office. It provides a list of reel contents and a list of correspondents.
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Greene, Nathanael. Nathanael Greene Papers

Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1966
2 reel(s)

After the military disaster at Camden in August 1780, General George Washington sent his trusted lieutenant, General Nathanael Greene, to take command of patriot forces in the South. Greene's immediate problem was to contest the British advance under Lord Cornwallis through the Carolinas and into Virginia. The papers center on correspondence between Greene and various other patriot leaders from 1780 to 1782. They include casualty reports from the battles at Guilford Court House and Cowpens, and from skirmishes around Charleston. They also include lists of militia, reports on negotiations with Indian tribes, and a copy of Cornwallis's plan for creating a Loyalist militia in South Carolina. The letter books cover the periods October-December 1780, January-February 1781, and January-April 1782. The general correspondence runs from 1775 to 1785. One additional volume contains the report of the commission appointed by Greene to negotiate with the Cherokees.

This collection contains three letter books, three volumes of general correspondence arranged chronologically, and one volume of commission reports.

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Guiteau’s Confession. The Garfield Assassination: Being a Full History of this Cruel Crime.

Philadelphia: The Old Franklin Publishing House, 1881
1 reel(s)

This illustrated pamphlet contains a short biography of Charles Julius Guiteau and the story of his assassination of President James A. Garfield in 1881.

Microfilmed by the Library of Congress; [n.d.]
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Guiteau’s Crime. The Full History of the Murder of President James A. Garfield with Complete Secret Biography of the Assassin

New York: Richard K. Fox, 1881
1 reel(s)

Note: This is issue #3 from the “Police Gazette Series of Famous Criminals.”
This illustrated gazette contains a short biography of Charles Julius Guiteau and the story of his assassination of President James A. Garfield in 1881.

Microfilmed by the Library of Congress; [n.d.]
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